Oklahoma State Linebacker Tests Positive for COVID-19 After Attending Protest in Tulsa



Meanwhile, health officials and political leaders have expressed concerns that many cities across the country could see a spike in COVID-19 cases in the coming weeks, as protests make social distancing near impossible.

Leaders like Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms have encouraged attendees to get tested for the virus.

“If you were out protesting last night, you probably need to go get a COVID test this week,” she said during a news briefing on Sunday. “There is still a pandemic in America that’s killing black and brown people at higher numbers.”

The New York Health Department also shared tips for protesters looking to stay safe, which include wearing a face covering and eye protection, using hand sanitizer, keeping six feet away from other groups and using signs and noisemakers instead of yelling.

As of Wednesday morning, there have been at least 6,692 cases and 339 deaths attributed to coronavirus in Oklahoma, according to The New York Times. There have been at least 1.8 million cases and 106,195 deaths in the United States.

To help combat systemic racism, consider learning from or donating to these organizations:

• Campaign Zero (joincampaignzero.org) which works to end police brutality in America through research-proven strategies.

• ColorofChange.org works to make government more responsive to racial disparities.

• National Cares Mentoring Movement (caresmentoring.org) provides social and academic support to help black youth succeed in college and beyond.

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, PEOPLE is committed to providing the most recent data in our coverage. Some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, readers are encouraged to use online resources from CDC, WHO, and local public health departments. PEOPLE has partnered with GoFundMe to raise money for the COVID-19 Relief Fund, a GoFundMe.org fundraiser to support everything from frontline responders to families in need, as well as organizations helping communities. For more information or to donate, click here.

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