Prankster fits mobility scooter on a coin-operated children's ride

Prankster leaves locals in stitches after going to the McDonald’s drive-thru in a miniature replica of Postman Pat’s Royal Mail van

  • Prankster Alton Tyrell, 40, delighted  his West Yorkshire town with the funny car
  • He spent 100 hours fitting the children’s coin-operated ride on mobility scooter
  • Hilarious video shows father-of-two ordering at his local McDonald’s drive-thru 

Hilarious footage shows a businessman driving around his hometown to the amusement of passersby – in a miniature replica of Postman Pat’s Royal Mail van.

Prankster Alton Tyrell, 40, from Heckmondwike, West Yorkshire, has delighted locals with his fun-loving antics after buying a coin-operated children’s ride and welding it to a mobility scooter.

Footage of Alton, who owns a car transporting company, taking the van through a McDonald’s drive-thru went viral, turning him into a ‘local celebrity.’

The father-of-two spent around 100 hours converting the old toy as a project to keep him occupied during lockdown.

When fully charged, the replica of the van used in the 1980s kids TV show can drive for up to five hours.

Prankster Alton Tyrell, 40, from Heckmondwike, West Yorkshire, has delighted locals with his fun-loving antics after buying a coin-operated children’s ride and welding it to a mobility scooter (pictured) 

It comes complete with the famed Pat 1 registration plate and tiny box windows made famous in the long-running animated series.

‘I just thought I’d do it for a laugh,’ explained Alton. ‘I wasn’t working, all the car dealerships were closed, so I thought I’d do a little project that could make people smile.

‘I’ve driven it as far as seven or eight miles. I only ever drive on the pavement as it’s not insured for the road, but the reaction from people has been brilliant.

‘It’s had a massive reaction, people who don’t know me recognise me when I’m out shopping or whatever.

The ride is a replica of Postman Pat’s Royal Mail van, complete with the registration plate Pat 1. Pictured, Alton drove it to his local McDonald’s Drive-thru

‘When I’m in my recovery truck, people are beeping me because they know it’s me.’

Alton finished converting the ride in late August and has been seen out and bout in his hometown throughout September.

One hilarious video sees him turn up at a Starbucks drive-thru and ordering food while a worker cracks up laughing.

After ordering, he asks the worker serving him: ‘You’re not laughing at my car, are you?’

She replies: ‘No, I like it. Don’t move, I need to get a picture.’

Another video sees him driving it across a zebra crossing in a busy town centre, much to the amusement of onlookers.

The father-of-two said he spent 100 hours welding the mobility scooter into the coin-operated children’s ride (pictured) 

Alton added: ‘When I went to Maccies in the van, it went viral and people starting tagging me in it.

‘Every other car beeps their horn at me, people are filming me wherever I go. I see people drive past and come back for another look and their laughing their heads off.’

Alton can enter and exit his ride by lifting the van up and sitting on the mobility scooter.

He added: ‘It’s like a scissor lift mechanism, so it’s quite easy really. But I think that’s what people find funny too, that it’s a grown man inside it.

‘I’ve had people come up to me thinking I was a kid that was driving a toy van and got lost or something.

Alton has now been asked by the Rugby Football League to deliver the match ball in October’s Challenge Cup final at Wembley Stadium

‘My wife loves it, I was in the garage all hours working on it, she knew what I was doing and thought it was funny. She knows I’ve always been a joker..’

Alton has been asked by the Rugby Football League if he can deliver the match ball in October’s Challenge Cup final at Wembley Stadium.

And Royal Mail have inquired about putting in on display in Selfridges in London over Christmas.

Alton added: ‘It’s really exploded and taken off since first bringing it home and jet washing it.

‘It’s a bit overwhelming when you go around and people stop you. You feel like a celebrity. People do a double-take, it’s not something you see every day is it?’

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