The effect ‘I’m A Celeb diet’ has on the body and what celebs should eat after the show – EXCLUSIVE

I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here! has finished and with it comes the end of nights in on the sofa watching celebs suffer. For the last three weeks we’ve watched with bated breath as famous faces have been tortured with spiders, scorpions and snakes, and laughed as they quivered on top of tall buildings or squealed in coffin-like boxes.

But the main struggle for the 12 campmates has to be the lack of food, after existing off rice and beans for three weeks with only the occasional treat from a bush trucker trial win.

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Each contestant undoubtedly lost weight, but it particularly affected rugby player James Haskell who told The Sun: “I was so hungry. I was unable to get off my bed and move. I had physical ailments from where I went from 4,000 calories to 250 calories. That is starvation. That was the biggest shock.”

But what does a diet of rice and beans do to the body, and how should the celebrities transition back onto a normal diet?

Speaking exclusively to OK! Online registered nutritionist Lara Baudains explained: “Although a diet of just rice and beans may be sustaining in the short term with just enough carbs to keep their energy levels up, another three weeks and they certainly would start to see the early signs of certain nutrient deficiencies.

“As most of us can relate to those all to familiar mid-afternoon hunger pangs, three weeks of these you’d be pretty much ready to eat your own arm! Eating just rice and beans is quite a drastic change from what the celebrities were eating before they entered the jungle and with a drastic decrease in overall calorie intake comes a drop in overall body fat.”

She then shed light on what dietary precautions the celebrities should ideally take once leaving the jungle, stating: “Not only would their metabolism have slightly slowed, but their appetite ‘thermostat’ would have changed in that it would take a lot less for them to feel full. It’s important to take things slow once they’re out the jungle to avoid excessive bloating and digestive issues.

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“Their first main meal should be well balanced and contain a small amount of lean protein, whole grain carbohydrates, healthy fats and some fresh vegetables. Keep the portion small and somewhat bland, and leave the spices for a week or so.”

Many of the celebrities indulged in slap up meals or booze as soon as the left the camp, not least football pundit Ian Wright who downed his glass of champagne before even being interviewed by presenters Ant and Dec. James Haskell also posted a snap to his Instagram hours after exiting the jungle, clutching both a slice of pizza and a beer.

While Lara acknowledges the need to give in to these cravings she explained that the celebrities should heed on the side of caution.

“They do need to be aware that three weeks living in the jungle in the heat may have lead to slight dehydration so it’s vital they stay on top their fluids and try to avoid caffeine, alcohol and high salt foods for the first few days at least,” she said.

Lara then went on to reveal why James suffered more than the other campmates seemed to during his time on the hit ITV show, stating: “Someone like James Haskell has a significantly higher metabolism than the other celebrities mainly due to his larger muscle mass. This explains why, when put on a calorie restricted diet of rice and beans, he lost a significant amount of weight.

“With that amount of fat loss comes the downside of a bit of muscle loss too, but at least the passenger sitting seat next to him on the flight home will have a little more room!”

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