The 500-year-old farmhouse converted into a stunning rental

Holiday in history! Country farmhouse lived in every day for over 500 years is converted at a cost of £4million into a stunning rental (and Prince Charles himself backed the restoration)

  • The stone and timber manor was one of the longest continuously occupied houses in Britain
  • The owners were forced to move out in 2014 when it became so run down it was being held up by scaffolding 
  • It has now been lovingly restored by the Landmark Trust charity, which rescues important buildings 

A country farmhouse lived in every day for over 500 years shut its doors for a £4m makeover – and has now reopened to holidaymakers who can take a trip into history.

The stone and timber manor was one of the longest continuously occupied houses in Britain after being a home since 1480.

Brothers Trevor and Lyndon Powell were the last of generations of farmers to live in the Grade I listed house.

A country farmhouse lived in every day for over 500 years shut its doors for a £4m makeover – and has now reopened to holidaymakers who can take a trip into history. Pictured here is the house before the restoration

The stone and timber manor was one of the longest continuously occupied houses in Britain after being a home since 1480. This is a pre-restoration shot of one of the rooms

What a difference a £4million restoration makes: This is the farmhouse after the Landmark Trust spruced it up

Conservationists said Llwyn Celyn, meaning Hollybush in English, is one of the most remarkable surviving medieval houses in Britain

But the siblings were forced to move out in 2014 when it became so run down it was being held up by scaffolding.

The house, called Llwyn Celyn, also suffered more destruction when a stream flooded through the ground floor due to heavy rains.


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It has now been lovingly restored by the Landmark Trust charity, which rescues important buildings.

Conservationists said Llwyn Celyn, meaning Hollybush in English, is one of the most remarkable surviving medieval houses in Britain.

The house at Cwmyoy, near Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, remains a rare example of a complete medieval manor house.

The house at Cwmyoy, near Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, remains a rare example of a complete medieval manor house

It has its original floor plan and much of its medieval joinery and decorative features

Landmark patron Prince Charles gave his backing for the restoration when he visited the farmhouse

It sleeps eight people in two twins and two double beds and costs from £880 for a four-night break

It has its original floor plan and much of its medieval joinery and decorative features.

Landmark patron Prince Charles gave his backing for the restoration when he visited the farmhouse.

The impressive building has now been opened to guests – so they can ‘holiday in history’.

It sleeps eight people in two twins and two double beds and costs from £880 for a four-night break.

The mammoth renovation took more than a decade in the planning and culminated in over two years of complex restoration work.

The mammoth renovation took more than a decade in the planning and culminated in over two years of complex restoration work

Dr Anna Keay, director at Landmark Trust, said: ‘It is Landmark’s 200th building, but also testament to the monumental enthusiasm and expertise of everyone involved. From the craftspeople who pieced it back together using traditional skills, to the supporters, volunteers and National Lottery players who made it all possible. Thanks to all of them a precious piece of our past has been secured and will now be with us for all to enjoy and understand for centuries to come’

The trust says it was one of the most complex restorations it has ever undertaken.

Dr Anna Keay, director at Landmark Trust, said: ‘It is Landmark’s 200th building, but also testament to the monumental enthusiasm and expertise of everyone involved.

‘From the craftspeople who pieced it back together using traditional skills, to the supporters, volunteers and National Lottery players who made it all possible.

‘Thanks to all of them a precious piece of our past has been secured and will now be with us for all to enjoy and understand for centuries to come.’

The house was built on the edge of the estates of the Augustinian Abbey of Llanthony.

It cost £4.2m to restore the site – including a £2.5m grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund. 

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