Christmas is a GO! Everything you can do on Christmas Day in England as NO new Covid rules are introduced

AFTER weeks of uncertainty, Boris Johnson has officially confirmed that Christmas is ON for families across England.

Brits can gather for indoor meals, go to the pub with loved ones and travel across the country to see friends and relatives on the big day.


But in a sombre warning of potential measures to come, the PM says he "will be ready to take action" after Boxing Day if Omicron cases spiral out of control.

For the time being, families are keen to gather after last Christmas saw Covid rules limit the number of people allowed to meet indoors.

Here, we break down what you can and can't do this Christmas.

Can I have Christmas dinner with family?

There are no limits on the number of people allowed to gather indoors – meaning any number of households and family members can meet up for lunch.

But Mr Johnson urged Brits to "exercise caution" as Omicron cases remain high.

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He has advised people to wear masks indoors when required, keep fresh air circulating by opening windows and take a test before visiting vulnerable or elderly relatives.

Can I go to the pub with friends?

Yes, there are no restrictions on pubs or restaurants.

Any number of people can meet at the pub for drinks or food with no curfew – and with no limits on the amount of households permitted to gather.

Can I travel to a different city?

There are no travel restrictions, meaning Brits can drive or get public transport to anywhere for Christmas gatherings.

There are no tiered restrictions in the UK this year, meaning the same guidance applies across England.

What are the rules in Scotland?

Christmas is on as normal in Scotland – but new restrictions come in to force from Boxing day.

From December 26,limits of 500 people will be enforced at large outdoor events, for both seated or standing, but Ms Sturgeon said live sport would be "effectively spectator free" – in a blow to footie fans.

For indoor events, there will be a limit of 100 standing and 200 seated.

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The plug has also been pulled on large-scale Hogmanay celebrations in Scotland as Ms Sturgeon said such gatherings have the "potential to become very rapid super-spreader events".

And from December 27, it will be table service only in boozers for up to three weeks and a one-metre social distancing measure must be followed.

Are there any new rules for England on Christmas?

There are no rules in place for Christmas in England, but Brits are urged to follow the guidelines.

Earlier this month, chief medical officer for England Chris Whitty urged Brits to cut down their socialising and meet outdoors.

Professor Whitty told the nation that it would be "sensible" for them be "prioritising social interactions that really matter to them" – urging Brits to ditch meetings to save Christmas gatherings.

At a gloomy press conference he said it was going to be more and more important as the nation get towards Christmas that "people take more precautions".

He urged people to do the things that we know help stop the spread such as "really good ventilation, meeting outdoors… and following sensible rules."

He added: "Don't mix with people with people you don't have to for either work or family things, for things that really matter to you."


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