Coronavirus vaccine LIVE news: Trial results published TODAY as UK buys early access to 90m doses and deaths pass 45,300

THE UK has secured early access to 90 million doses of coronavirus vaccines.

No 10 have signed deals for three jabs, one being jointly developed by BioNTech and Pfizer, another by French company Valneva and the third with AstraZeneca.

Business minister Alok Sharma said: "This new partnership with some of the world's foremost pharmaceutical and vaccine companies will ensure the UK has the best chance possible of securing a vaccine that protects those most at risk.”

All three jabs are still in the development stages.

And results from the first round of trials of an Oxford university vaccine are due to be published in the Lancet medical journal today.

A spokeswoman for Oxford University said on July 15 that the team was awaiting confirmation from a scientific journal of the publication date and time for the data, but gave no further details.

The Oxford team previously said they are "80 per cent" confident they will have a working jab by September.

And the coronavirus death toll has risen to 45,300 – but the figures have not been confirmed by Department of Health over concerns that Public Health England's numbers have been over-exaggerated.

Follow all the latest coronavirus news and updates below…

  • COUPLE FORCED TO WEAR ANKLE MONITORS AFTER REFUSING TO QUARANTINE

    A Kentucky couple were placed under house arrest and forced to wear ankle monitors after refusing to sign a self-quarantine order after testing positive for coronavirus.

    Elizabeth and Isaiah Linscott said authorities from the health department and sheriff's office showed up at their Radcliff, Kentucky, home Thursday because she declined to sign the order.

    The woman had voluntarily tested for COVID-19 before going to visit her parents out of state and found she was positive but without symptoms.

  • CHINA TENSIONS HIT BOILING POINT

    Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab is gearing up to follow the US, Canada and Australia and refuse to extradite people in the UK in to Hong Kong after the communist state imposed tough security laws.

    Tensions have reached boiling point after the Government banned Huawei – the Chinese Communist party owned telecoms giant – from the 5G network in Britain.

    Things were already on thin ice over a supposed cover-up of China’s real coronavirus numbers.

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    DRUG HAS ‘HUGE POTENTIAL,’ SAYS PROF

    Professor Tom Wilkinson, professor of respiratory medicine at the University of Southampton and trial chief investigator, said he is “delighted with the positive data produced from this trial”.

    He added: “The results confirm our belief that interferon beta, a widely known drug that, by injection, has been approved for use in a number of other indications, has huge potential as an inhaled drug to be able to restore the lungs' immune response, enhancing protection, accelerating recovery and countering the impact of Sars-CoV-2 virus.”

    Professor Stephen Holgate, Medical Research Council clinical professor of immunopharmacology at the University of Southampton and co-founder of Synairgen, said the treatment “restores the lungs' ability to neutralise the virus, or any mutation of the virus or co-infection with another respiratory virus such as influenza or RSV, as could be encountered in the winter if there is a resurgence of Covid-19.”

    UK COVID DEATHS PER DAY

    ‘79% OF COVID CASES BEATEN WITH NEW DRUG’

    Trials of an inhaled coronavirus treatment found that hospital patients who took the drug had a 79% lower risk of developing severe disease.

    According to early results of the study, patients who received the drug, known as SNG001, were more than twice as likely to recover from Covid-19 as those who received a placebo.

    The treatment has been developed by the pharmaceutical company Synairgen.

    COVID SCAMMER STUDENT JAILED

    A straight-A student who masterminded a 'sickening' coronavirus swindle against the most vulnerable members of the public has been jailed for 30 weeks.

    Mohammed Khan, 20, sent thousands of fraudulent texts and emails inviting unwitting victims to fill in their bank details in exchange for 'a Covid-19 tax break'.

    The messages contained logos 'remarkably similar to UK government websites so one would think it was from Her Majesty's government'.

    The victim's personal information was sent to the 'clearly very clever' Queen Mary politics student 'with a view to committing fraud against their bank accounts'.

    Khan also passed the information along with templates for fraudulent websites to other scammers via WhatsApp, Inner London Crown Court heard.

    He had been operating a number of sophisticated scams since 2017 but began to exploit the crisis the day before lockdown came into effect on March 22.

    Khan, who lives with his parents and two siblings, was arrested at his home in Camden, northwest London, on May 13.

    HANCOCK URGES PUBLIC TO SIGN UP TO VACCINE TRIALS

    Health Secretary Matt Hancock tweeted: “Britain has now secured early access to 90 million potential coronavirus vaccine doses. I want to thank all involved who've achieved this.

    “Members of the public have a vital role to play. I urge everyone who can to back the national effort & sign up to the NHS COVID-19 vaccine research registry to help find a vaccine as soon as possible.”

    ANTI MASK PROTESTERS IN OHIO

    SCOTTISH CALL CENTRE COULD FACE SANCTIONS OVER OUTBREAK

    Scotland's Deputy First Minister has not ruled out penalties being levied against the owners of a North Lanarkshire call centre which has seen a cluster of Covid-19 cases.

    Six cases were reported on Sunday within the Sitel call centre at Eurocentral business park near Bellshill, which is currently working on test and trace cases for NHS England.

    John Swinney said on Monday that the outbreak was a matter of “serious concern”, adding the Scottish Government believed there had been transmission between staff.

    Mr Swinney also said investigations would need to be undertaken to “get an understanding” of how guidance was being followed within the facility.

    When asked on the BBC's Good Morning Scotland radio programme on Monday if penalties could levied against Sitel, Mr Swinney said: “These are all issues that will be explored, but what our primary focus is on is to make sure that we interrupt any transmission of the virus.

    WHEN ARE RESULTS FROM THE OXFORD COVID TRIALS EXPECTED?

    Findings from the first phase of the human trials are due to be published on July 20 in the Lancet medical journal.

    A spokeswoman for Oxford University said on July 15 that the team was awaiting confirmation from a scientific journal of the publication date and time for the data, but gave no further details.

    The Oxford team previously said they are “80 per cent” confident they will have a working jab by September.

    QUARTER OF ANTIVAXXER BRITS RISK LONGER LOCKDOWN

    A quarter of people in the UK may refuse to be vaccinated against Covid-19, according to a new survey.

    The troubling findings come ahead of results of an Oxford University trial which will show whether a jab it is developing is safe and triggers a immune fightback against coronavirus.

    Shocking figures suggest 27 per cent of people could refuse the vaccine because they believe myths being peddled by “anti-vaxxers”.

    M&S ‘TO CUT 100S OF JOBS’

    Marks and Spenceris planning on axing hundreds of jobs this week – with thousands more roles feared to be in the firing line because of coronavirus, it's been reported.

    The iconic high street retailer will join the likes of John Lewis, Boots, and Debenhams in announcing scores of job cuts and store closures.

    Sky News reports that M&S will begin announcing redundancy plans this week.

    But sources also told the news channel that several thousand more jobs could go as chief executive Steve Rowe ramps up an ongoing restructuring of the business.

    Sky News says the redundancy announcement expected this week will form the first phase of its larger jobs cut plan.

    CRITICAL WORKERS FIRST FOR VACCINES

    Critical workers will be the first in line for vaccines after Britain secured early access to 90 million potential doses.

    The Education Secretary Gavin Williams today praised the new deal with pharmaceutical companies and promised Britain's health professionals would get access to any vaccine first.

    Appearing on Sky News, the senior minister claimed vaccines were the most important weapon against the pandemic.

    He said: “There is not a single silver bullet but we do have to recognise the vaccine is the safest and best route of this crisis.

    “It is right that the government is making the investment and placing these orders with these vaccines so we have a range of options.

    “The first stage will obviously be those critical workers, and there will be a basis of assessment, but it's about making sure we have vaccines for the whole population.”

    BEEFEATERS FACE JOB LOSSES

    Iconic Tower of London Beefeaters face the axe for the first time in 500 years — because of coronavirus.

    The 37 Yeoman Warders have been told redundancies are looming after visitor numbers ­collapsed, leaving a huge hole in finances.

    EDUCATION SEC ON VACCINE TRIALS

    Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said he would “absolutely” take part in a coronavirus vaccine trial.

    Mr Williamson told BBC Breakfast on Monday that 500,000 people would be needed to take part in clinical trials during the winter months.

    It comes as the Government announced it had signed new deals which will provide more than 90 million doses of Covid-19 vaccine.

    Asked if a vaccine would be ready by winter, Mr Williamson said: “The whole purpose is that they will be getting trialled out.

    “Half a million people will be having the trials of these vaccines and it will be something that comes after winter.”

    Asked if he would take part in a trial, Mr Williamson said: “Absolutely. As you are probably aware politicians tend to meet lots of people, so it would be a sensible thing to do.”

    ONE IN FOUR CHILDCARE PROVIDERS COULD FOLD

    Labour's shadow education secretary said one in four childcare providers believe they will not be in business by the end of the year.

    Kate Green told BBC Breakfast that the prospect of providers going out of business was “really worrying” for parents who need to find childcare when they return to work.

    She said: “The problem for childcare providers is that lack of capacity means a lack of income and some of them are becoming financially unviable.

    “So the consequence of less demand is that it's possible, and indeed the childcare providers are saying this, that some of them will go out of business altogether.

    “One in four think they may not still be around within the year, and that's really worrying when parents need to find childcare places so they can go back to work and know that their children are being looked after safely.”

    SCHOOLS CAN SPEND ‘COVID CATCHUP’ FUND HOWEVER THEY LIKE

    Schools will be able to decide how to spend new Government coronavirus “catch-up” funding, the Education Secretary has said.

    Gavin Williamson told BBC Breakfast on Monday that the money equates to an extra £80,000 per secondary school and £16,000 for an “average, small” primary school.

    He said: “How the schools spend that money is very much up to their discretion. But we have set out guidance as to how best to spend (it).”

    Mr Williamson added: “In terms of Covid catch-up it's about making sure teachers have ability to do an assessment of the children on where they have fallen behind, what they have missed out on, how we get the right types of interventions.”

    He said schools will be able to “lay on” extra support outside of normal hours to give “special catch-up” sessions to children.

    PEOPLE 'MORE CONCERNED ABOUT IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON FINANCES THAN BREXIT'

    People are more concerned about the impact of Covid-19 on their finances than they are about Brexit, a survey suggests.

    When it comes to the two major challenges the UK faces – the handling of the coronavirus pandemic and Brexit – two-thirds, or 65 percent, think the pandemic is more concerning for their personal finances.

    More than a fifth (21 percent) believe Brexit is the bigger threat, Nationwide Building Society found.

    The findings were published as part of Nationwide's savings index which was compiled from a survey of more than 11,000 people across Britain in May.

    The research found that, despite many households now living on reduced incomes, nearly two-fifths (37 percent) of people had put more into a savings account than they would usually, rising to 45 percent in 18 to 34-year-olds.

    Only one in six people said they had saved less since lockdown started on March 23.

    And more than a third – 36% percent – wish they had saved more before the pandemic struck.

    US REPORTS 67,574 NEW COVID-19 CASES, TOTAL NOW AT 3,698,161

    The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Sunday reported 67,574 new coronavirus cases, taking the total to 3,698,161.

    It said the number of deaths had risen by 877 to 139,659.

    The CDC noted the figures do not necessarily reflect cases reported by individual states.

    BELFAST NURSE HEADS UP CORONAVIRUS CENTRE IN WORLD'S LARGEST REFUGEE CAMP

    A Belfast nurse is heading up a new coronavirus isolation and treatment centre in the world's largest refugee camp.

    Rachel Fletcher has been working in the Cox's Bazar area of Bangladesh for months, helping with efforts to build the centre, secure PPE supplies and train staff to treat patients.

    Ms Fletcher is a part of Save The Children's Emergency Health Unit, which is a team of international specialists who respond to deadly disease outbreaks across the globe.

    The former Belfast Trust nurse spent almost a year fighting the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014 and, more recently, was deployed to help those caught up in humanitarian crisis in Yemen.

    Cox's Bazar houses nearly one million Rohingya refugees who fled violence in Burma.

    Families live in overcrowded conditions, making social distancing nearly impossible.

    Ms Fletcher, who is the manager of the newly opened treatment centre, travelled to Bangladesh with London nurse Rachael Cummings.

    “It's been a race against time to get the centre ready,” said Ms Fletcher.

    “Conditions are tough. We're here to support local health teams and walk with them on this difficult journey, particularly when faced with the impossible decision of who gets a hospital bed and who doesn't, when resources are stretched.”

    COVID LOCKDOWN 'COULD KILL 200,000 PEOPLE' DUE TO HOSPITAL DELAYS AND ECONOMIC RECESSION

    AN official government report has warned hundreds of thousands of people could die from the impact of the coronavirus lockdown as a result of hospital delays and a severe economic downturn.

    In the report, published in April, the government estimated up to 25,000 could die in the first months of the pandemic and a further 185,000 in the medium to long term.

    Read more on the story here.

    FACE COVERING PRODUCTION AS PART OF £14M GOVERNMENT INVESTMENT GETS UNDER WAY

    Production of face coverings has begun at two sites across the UK as part of £14 million Government investment in manufacturing millions of coverings each week, a minister has announced.

    The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster Michael Gove said on Monday that suppliers in Port Talbot, Wales, and Blackburn in north-west England, had started producing “high quality” face coverings, with another site in Livingston, Scotland, to begin in the coming weeks.

    It is part of a Government drive to increase production of face coverings in the UK, he added.

    Face coverings are already compulsory on public transport in England and the Government has made it mandatory to wear them in shops and supermarkets from July 24 to reduce the spread of coronavirus.

    Government guidance also encourages the wearing of face coverings in enclosed public spaces where it is less easy to socially distance or where people are more likely to come into contact with people they would not normally meet.

    Mr Gove said: “This is a major step to ensure that this country can meet any increase in demand for face coverings by working with British firms to establish the capability, capacity and skills required to manufacture these items at scale.

    “These production lines will be able to get millions of face coverings to the public, without putting any additional pressure on NHS supply chains.”

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    CHILDREN MAY FIND SCHOOLS 'STRANGE' ON RETURN TO CLASS, PSYCHIATRIST WARNS

    Schools may feel like a “strange place” to pupils when they return next month due to safety measures amid the coronavirus pandemic, a leading psychiatrist has warned.

    Many children will be looking forward to being reunited with their friends and returning to formal learning next month for the first time since March, but classes will not be the same as they were before lockdown.

    The Scottish Government's scientific advisers have said pupils can return in August without physical distancing if coronavirus continues to be suppressed, but teachers should remain two metres apart where possible.

    Teachers would need to wear a mask if they are face-to-face with pupils for more than 15 minutes and cannot be two metres away from them, the advisers say.

    Dr Justin Williams, vice-chair of the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services faculty at the Royal College of Psychiatrists in Scotland, said going to school could therefore feel very different.

    He told the PA news agency: “It's not just about going back to a routine, it's about going back to a routine with a lot of extra rules that are likely to be necessary to minimise risk and that's going to be challenging for a lot of young people.”

    Source: Read Full Article