Daredevil Briton, 21, climbs 280ft to top of tallest climbing wall

Daredevil Briton, 21, who was jailed for scaling The Shard climbs 280ft to top of world’s tallest climbing wall with no ropes or safety equipment

  • George King, 21, spent 12 weeks in prison in 2019 after climbing the Shard
  • He has spoken to MailOnline about his latest up the world’s tallest climbing wall 
  • George ascended the CopenHill wall in Denmark without any safety equipment

A young daredevil who was jailed for climbing the Shard scaled the world’s tallest climbing wall today with no ropes or safety equipment.

Incredible footage shows George King, 21, from Oxford, go 282 feet up the CopenHill climbing wall in Copenhagen, Denmark.

George started the climb at 5am today to become the first person in the world to free-solo the world’s highest climbing wall built on the side of a powerplant.

The 282-foot wall was created by architectural company Bjarke Ingels Group and George decided to climb it to highlight Denmark’s ‘outstanding eco innovation’.

Incredible footage shows George King, 21, from Oxford, go 282 feet up the CopenHill climbing wall in Copenhagen

The 282-foot wall was created by architectural company Bjarke Ingels Group and George decided to climb it to highlight Denmark’s ‘outstanding eco innovation’

He told MailOnline: ‘I’m absolutely buzzing. You get to the top and can’t really believe what is happening – you are in a state of shock.

‘What was a visualisation for the past two months is now a reality. It takes a bit of time for it to sink in.

‘I don’t think anything could compare to the feeling.

‘When I got to the top, I avoided capture by climbing down the other side of the building, so I didn’t get arrested.’

It is illegal to climb the CopenHill wall without some form of safety kit.

After going up The Shard in London, George gained fame from a Channel 4 documentary that followed his journey, explored his motives and his family’s reaction to the extreme climb.

A policeman met George at the top of The Shard, where he shook his hand instead of arresting him.

He was not charged for trespass as it was seen as a civil offence rather than a criminal one but was jailed for contempt of court after breaching a High Court injunction on the building.

Piers Morgan dubbed him as The Great British Daredevil when he featured on Good Morning Britain in January 2020 after he was released from prison.

After serving half of his six-month sentence he released a documentary with Channel 4 in 2020 called ‘The Boy Who Climbed The Shard’.

Back in 2018 George became the first in the world to freeclimb the former world’s tallest climbing wall, Excalibur in Groningen, Netherlands.

He was also the first to do the same on the UK’s tallest climbing wall, ROKT in Bridghouse, West Yorkshire, which at 36m is taller than both the Tower of London and the Angel of the North.

This year’s climbs have seen George arrested twice after going up two major skyscrapers in Barcelona, Hotel Meliá and Tower Agbar.

He told MailOnline: ‘In order to not have any fear whilst doing it I had to accept death beforehand.

‘I had to do that so I wasn’t worried about what my parents would think if I died, will I go to prison, there was no what if’s because I just accepted fate.

‘It was a tactic I came up with in the moment [on the Melia building] and it has worked really well.

‘It’s as simple as saying, if I die, I die.

‘I didn’t want to die, that wasn’t my intention, I wanted to live, but by doing that it allowed me to climb without the fear of death.

‘If anything distracts your mind whilst you’re doing something like that could be highly detrimental so by me just accepting fate, then I’m not focusing on it.’

George described spending Christmas in prison as ‘just another day’ and was able to see families giving gifts around the tree from his cell window at HMP Holloway.

George started the climb at 5am today to become the first person in the world to free-solo the world’s highest climbing wall built on the side of a powerplant

After going up The Shard in London, George gained fame from a Channel 4 documentary that followed his journey, explored his motives and his family’s reaction to the extreme climb

Now living in Bermondsey, London, George left prison to soon be in national lockdown and started adding train surfing to his list of extreme activities.

He said: ‘In a situation like being stuck prison I laugh at it because I like struggling through something, I like discomfort.

‘The whole thing of me being incarcerated was to deter me but if anything, it did quite the opposite.

‘It only intensified my obsession with climbing buildings.

‘I enjoy it, because I know there is a light at the end of the tunnel and there is always something positive to gain out of the struggle.’

Speaking on his climb today, he said: ‘As a young person I feel concerned about our environment and the legacy we leave for our children and for future generations.

‘I chose CopenHill because it is a world leader in environmental matters. The climb itself was exhilarating.

‘It worked well too because it enabled me to complete a trinity of climbs and to be the first to free-solo all three of the highest climbing walls in the world without ropes or safety.’

Channel 4 has just finished filming a series with the young free-climber called George King’s Adrenaline Addicts which will be released later this month.

The three-part series will feature George speaking to like-minded people who enjoy an adrenaline rush, including bare knuckle boxers and base jumpers.

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