Diving into heatwave! Britons flock to the beach as temperatures rise

Diving into the heatwave! Britons flock to the beach and cool off in the sea before temperatures are expected to peak at 95F tomorrow and 96.8F on Saturday with drought warnings over the weekend

  • There is an ‘extreme heat warning’ for large parts of the UK as temperatures soar to 36C (96.8F) in some areas 
  • National Drought Group is expected to meet tomorrow and is said to be about to declare a drought for areas
  • A double heat warning has been put in place by experts amid the sweltering heatwave temperatures 
  • The high temperatures are likely to affect health, transport and working conditions, meteorologists said 
  • Oxfordshire village has become the first in Britain to run dry – with residents forced to rely on delivered water 

Brits are flocking to the beach today during the latest heatwave to rock the country as temperatures are set to peak tomorrow at 95F (35C) amid an amber warning for extreme heat in parts of the UK. 

It has also emerged that a drought could be declared for some parts of England on Friday as 96.8F (36C) temperatures are forecasted from Saturday. 

The National Drought Group – made up of Government and agency officials, water companies and other groups such as the National Farmers’ Union (NFU) – is set to meet tomorrow to discuss the prolonged dry weather.

There are expectations drought could be declared for some parts of England such as southern and eastern areas, could prompt action by agencies and water companies to manage water resources to ensure supplies and protect the environment after the driest July on record for some areas and the driest first half of the year since 1976.

Four water companies in England and Wales have already brought in hosepipe bans or have signalled their intention to do so, while the Wildlife Trusts have called for an England-wide hosepipe ban to protect nature and rivers. 

The ongoing dry conditions, combined with last month’s record-breaking heatwave, have depleted rivers, reservoirs and aquifers and dried up soils, hitting agriculture, water supplies and wildlife and raising the risk of wildfires.

It comes as fire crews have been battling ferocious wildfires across the capital today amid the sweltering temperatures across the dry, tinderbox conditions – while a ‘substantial fire involving crop’ continues to rage in Leicestershire. 

The Met Office raised its Fire Severity Index to exceptional – the highest level – today for much of southern England, and Wales alongside an amber, as the mercury is forecast to climb to ‘lethally hot’ temperatures of 35C (95F) over the weekend. The warning system also been at its second highest level of alert for seven weeks, which is the longest stretch since 1976.

The heat is likely to affect health, transport and working conditions, meteorologists said, as water companies are being urged to protect essential supplies heading into a ‘likely very dry autumn’.

A woman jumps into the sea at Brighton beach today as amber extreme heat warning has come into force, with temperatures forecast to hit 36C (96.8F) in some parts of the UK

People are packed into Bournemouth Beach today to enjoy the sunshine as drought warnings are in force across England

Trampolinist, Nicole Steiner from Switzerland is pictured today practicising some moves on a dried out Parliament Square in central London after competing in the Freestyle Trampoline World Championships in Hackney, east London

Beach goers enjoy the sunshine in Brighton and jump off in the sea as an amber extreme heat warning has come into force, with temperatures forecast to hit 37C (99F) in some parts of the UK over the next four days

Pictured: Aung-Bo, a 21-year-old asian elephant is cooled down by a keeper at Chester Zoo during the heatwave on Thursday 

Pictured: Sunseekers head to Bournemouth beach on Thursday morning to enjoy the sizzling heatwave amid warning from the Met Office 

Pictured: A woman is seen shading her face from the early morning sun, while commuting through Hyde Park in London this morning 

Pictured: London Underground Commuters head into work via the Jubilee line on Thursday morning 

Pictured: West Midlands fire service are warning Britons to stay safe in the heat and keep hydrated throughout the heatwave

Pictured: Sunseekers arrive at Bournemouth beach this morning to enjoy an early dip in the sea 

Pictured: Britons arrive at Bournemouth beach early to secure their spot before crowds arrive as the day progresses 

A cyclist braves the soaring temperatures across Britain today as the Met Office has also raised its Fire Severity Index to exceptional

Wildfires threaten to sweep across the country this weekend posing an ‘exceptional risk’ to homes, as an ‘Extreme Heat’ warning comes into force from today with temperatures set to reach at least 33C (91F) in London

A cheeky Londoner has been caught filling up their paddling pool using a council water tap in one of the city’s parched parks.

The pool was spotted in St George’s Square, Pimlico, and posted to Twitter by a social media user who quizzed Westminster City Council on whether the recreational use of public water was a safety risk given the shortages. 

Replying to a heatwave warning from the council on Twitter, the concerned park-goer wrote: ‘What is WCC policy on unattended swimming pools in public green spaces using water from council water taps? Is this a safety risk in St George’s Square? 

The large, turquoise inflatable was found being filled with water from a yellow tap, supposed to be reserved for use on plants, on the park’s dry grass. 

A cheeky Londoner has been caught filling up their paddling pool using a council water tap in St George’s Square, Pimlico, as a concerned park-goer tweeted Westminster City Council to question whether it was a safety risk during a heatwave

‘Trees & wildlife are now under threat due to water shortages. What are the priorities?’

In response, the council said the water was for shrubs and plants only, adding: ‘We’d not advocate filling up pools or any other receptacle in our green spaces, especially in a heatwave.’

This comes as Thames Water announce a hosepipe ban will come into force ‘within weeks’ for it’s 15 million London customers.

Had the ban already been in place when the photo was taken, the person involved would have been committing an offence and could face a fine of up to £1000.

This would come under the rule that you must not use a hosepipe to maintain or fill a domestic swimming pool, paddling pool, pond or water fountain unless it is for the welfare of fish or other aquatic animals, or for recognised religious practices.

Other things prohibited under the ban include: jet-washing the outside of your property or using a hosepipe to wash your car, clean paths or patios, clean a private leisure boat, or water plants in your home or garden.

Temperatures in London have stayed hot since last months record-breaking 40C highsThe Met Office have predicted the mercury will stay above 30C for the rest of the week and amber extreme heat warnings are in place until Sunday.

 

The London Fire Brigade were called at 11:36am to a fire at Hollow Ponds on Whipps Cross Road in Leytonstone, where around 75 square metres of grass and shrub land were alight. Two fire engines and around 10 firefighters attended the scene and the inferno was under control around an hour later. The cause of the blaze is still being investigated.

National Highways have also urged Britons to be ‘prepared’ with bottles of water before setting out amid more train strikes scheduled this weekend. 

Met Office meteorologist Marco Petagna said: ‘The risk is very high across much of central, southern and eastern England. Going into Friday and the weekend, it starts to increase further, going into the highest category of exceptional risk.’

Heatwave thresholds – which are met at different temperatures in different parts of the country – are likely to be hit in much of the UK.

Temperatures reached 34.2C at Wiggonholt, West Sussex, on Thursday afternoon, and climbed above 33C in a number of places from Shropshire to the south east of England. 

Met Office chief meteorologist Andy Page also said: ‘Persistent high pressure over the UK means temperatures have been rising day-on-day through this week and it is important people plan for the heat.

‘Temperatures are expected to peak at 35C on Friday and possibly 36C over the weekend.

‘We will also see increasingly warm nights, with temperatures expected not to drop below the low 20s for some places in the south.’

He said temperatures would drop early next week, with heavy showers and thunderstorms likely in some areas – but it was ‘impossible to say yet exactly where and when they will occur’.

Britain has been told to brace for a sweltering heatwave this week as a Level 3 Heat Health Alert also came into effect Tuesday and has been extended until Saturday – with little rain expected to help relieve the threat of drought which has prompted hosepipe bans and fire warnings. 

Mark Hardingham, the chairman of the National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) said that he ‘can’t remember a summer like this’ in his entire 32-year career in the fire service.

He told The Telegraph: ‘We’re not going to see temperatures as hot as we saw three weeks ago, but that doesn’t matter because the ground couldn’t get any drier than it already is.

‘The wildfires are as prevalent in semi-urban areas as they are in rural communities so it’s difficult to know where the next one will be.’

It comes as firefighters are tackling a village field fire in Leicestershire this afternoon as temperatures soar across the county. 

Leicestershire Fire and Rescue Service were called to reports of a ‘substantial fire involving crop’ in Sutton Cheney, north of Hinckley.

Crews were first alerted to the scene in Bosworth Road at 12.46pm and are still tackling the blaze. 

People have been asked to avoid the area while the fire is dealt with. Leicestershire Police has also been called to the scene.

Meanwhile, London Fire Brigade said its control room had dealt with 340 grass, rubbish and open land fires during the first week of August – an eightfold increase on the 42 during the same week last year.

Assistant Commissioner Jonathan Smith said: ‘This summer has seen an unprecedented long, dry spell with high temperatures, so the grass in London is tinderbox dry and the smallest of sparks can start a blaze which could cause devastation. 

‘Despite our continued warning over the last few weeks, we know there are still people who are barbecuing in parks, dropping cigarettes out of car windows and leaving rubbish lying around.

‘We really need to prevent a repeat of the situation we saw on July 19, when homes, shops, garages, outbuildings and vehicles were destroyed across London in a number of significant fires.

Grass wildfire on Canvey Island today. A wildfire started very close to the big Morrison’s store and spread very quickly.

A man is pictured walking on a path amongst dead grass in Victoria Park, east London. The Met Office has issued an amber heat warning running between Thursday and Sunday, which could see temperatures peak at 36C across southern England and eastern Wales

Sunseeking Brits flock to Bournemouth beach on Thursday as temperatures soar past 30C 

Algal blooms are smothering parts of the Jubilee River in Slough, Berkshire. As the heatwave continues an Amber Level 3 Heat Health Alert remains in force with temperatures forecast to peak on Saturday

Firefighter battles a wall of flames as he and his crew attempt to put out a grass fire at Hollow Ponds in Leytonstone, East London on Thursday

Firefighters put out a grass fire at Hollow Ponds in Leytonstone, East London on Thursday afternoon as parts of the UK have become a tinder box due to the extreme hot weather

Pictured: A view from the runway of Gatwick Airport sees smoke billowing in the distance from a suspected wildfire from the Crawley area earlier today. The heat and constant dry weather in the south west has risen concerns about serious drought and wildfires

Pictured: An alarming aerial image shows Euston Estate farm’s depleted reservoirs, located outside Thetford

Pictured: Skyrocketing energy prices, drought and historic heatwaves are all heavily affecting the Euston Estate farm, which is fighting to save its crops

Pictured: Bournemouth beach is filled with families enjoying the sweltering temperatures during the summer holidays  

Pictured: As the scorching heatwave continues, cattle search for drinking water in Dartmoor, Devon, at what until recently was an established watering hole, but is now completely dry

Pictured: Britons head to the Bournemouth beach coastline to enjoy the scorching heatwave temperatures amid a Level 3 Heat Health Alert 

An aerial photograph taken today shows dried out fields at the Euston Estate farm, outside Thetford, as drought is expected to be declared tomorrow

‘So please – we are asking Londoners to help us protect the city we all love by doing everything you can to prevent further grass fires. Please don’t barbecue in open spaces or balconies, throw your rubbish away safely and put your cigarettes out properly.’

Riccardo La Torre, national officer for the Fire Brigades Union, has also warned that services across the UK are ‘completely unprepared’ for the level of risk posed by the imminent heatwave.

Mr La Torre told Sky News: ‘These are brutal, brutal fires to fight. The temperature that they burn at, the speed at which they spread at.

‘The reality is we’ve been left completely unprepared to do that as a fire and rescue service.

‘We’ve had over a fifth of the workforce cut since 2010, that’s over 11,500 firefighters cut. Yet we’re asking them to deal with these extreme weather events in increasing regularity and increasing severity.

The Met Office has raised the Fire Severity Index to exceptional – the highest level – for much of southern England, and stretching as far west as Abergavenny in Wales, for this coming Sunday



Mark Hardingham, the chairman of the National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) told The Telegraph that he ‘can’t remember a summer like this’ in his entire 32-year career in the fire service. Pictured: The Met Office’s Fire Severity Index (FSI) which shows how the red ‘highest risk’ is spreading from Thursday (left) to Friday (middle) to Saturday (right)

In soaring temperatures ahead of warnings for extreme heat, fire crews attend a large wildfire between St Hilary and St Erth in Cornwall

County Durham and Darlington firefighters dealt with multiple grass fires amid increasing temperatures on Wednesday

The Met Office has raised its Fire Severity Index to exceptional – the highest level – today for much of southern England, and Wales alongside an amber, as the mercury is forecast to climb to ‘lethally hot’ temperatures of 35C (95F) this weekend

Pictured: The sun rises high above the London skyline on Thursday morning as temperatures are set to reach 36C in parts of England this weekend

Pictured: A group of men go for a job along the promenade at Bournemouth beach on Thursday morning 

Families take shelter under sun umbrellas as they enjoy a day out to Bournemouth beach amid searing temperatures on Thursday

Pictured: Families enjoying their summer holidays head to Bournemouth beach on Thursday to make the most of the soaring temperatures 

Pictured: Brits have been pictured enjoying the sea at Bournemouth beach on Thursday morning as the Met Office’s amber ‘extreme heat’ warning comes into force

Pictured: London underground commuters are pictured waiting for the Jubilee line to arrive on Thursday morning 

Pictured: A woman rides an electric scooter along the promenade at Bournemouth beach on Thursday morning

Pictured: Sunseekers head to Bournemouth beach this morning to enjoy the sizzling temperatures 

Council suspends food and garden waste collections for a MONTH – in the middle of  heatwave

Waltham Forest Council gave residents just five days notice that their food bins and garden waste bins will not be collected until September 12

Some Londoners have been left outraged after being informed by their council that food bins will not be collected from their homes for more than a month despite the next heatwave looming.

Waltham Forest Council took to social media to let people know that from August 15, both food and garden waste bins will not be collected until September 12.

Furious residents of the north-east London borough have fired back, highlighting that their ‘rotting’ food will be left uncollected during the UK heatwave.  

And Waltham Forest deputy group leader for the Conservatives Afzal Akram revealed that him and his colleagues were ‘flabbergasted’ when they heard about the suspension.

Cllr Akram told MailOnline: ‘We are flabbergasted by this decision being made and by the way it has been communicated.

‘We as councillors only heard about it once the council put it out on social media. It’s one of those blue sky thinking moments that you think of something and straight away you should throw it in the bin.

‘But for them to go and implement it is ridiculous. We are in a heatwave and they expect residents to leave food lying their for month – the stench, the stink is going to be unbelievable.’

The council believes that the ‘temporary’ measure will allow it to focus on other services over the summer and reduce unnecessary journeys.

It highlighted that less garden waste has had to be collected given the lack of rainfall in the UK this summer.

The council has told homeowners to dispose of any garden and food waste in brown bins until collection resumes.

‘The professionals on the ground have been warning that these conditions are coming and we very much saw the reality of that in these last few weeks. 

‘Firefighters have been injured, firefighters have ended up in hospital, we’ve seen families lose their homes, we’ve seen businesses lost, infrastructure burn to the ground, because we simply can’t get to these fires quick enough.

‘When we do, we simply don’t have the resources to deal with them adequately.’

Labour accused the Tories of putting ‘the smoke alarm on snooze’ as wildfires break out across the country, with ‘woeful’ resilience planning to the extreme heat.

And Riccardo la Torre, national officer of the Fire Brigades Union, accused the Government and fire chiefs of pressing ahead with cutting jobs.

He said firefighters were making ‘phenomenal’ efforts to deal with the outbreak of summer fires, claiming that fire services were unprepared for the crisis.

Climate change is making heatwaves more intense, frequent and likely – with July’s record temperatures of more than 40C for the first time for the UK made at least 10 times more likely because of global warming, and ‘virtually impossible’ without it, research shows.

Scientists also say droughts are becoming more likely due to human-driven climate change, warning of the need to cut greenhouse gas emissions and take steps to prepare the UK for the impacts of rising temperatures.

Mike Childs, head of research at Friends of the Earth, said the climate crisis was ‘hitting home’ this summer.

‘As another health-threatening heatwave hits the UK, rivers and reservoirs run dry and drought threatens our food and water supplies, a deepening cost of living crisis is set to leave millions more people unable to afford their energy bills,’ he said.

He said it was ‘utterly baffling’ the candidates were not grabbing green solutions, as he called for investment in the UK’s renewable potential and kicking starting an insulation programme to keep homes warm in winter and cool in summer.

Jonathan Smith, assistant commissioner at London Fire Brigade, has said ‘we’re not out of the woods as far as this heatwave is concerned’, as he urged people to avoid using disposable barbecues and take care when extinguishing cigarettes.

Mr Smith added: ‘We’re urging the public to think about and modify their behaviour over the course of the next four days in particular to take that pressure off the emergency services… we’re not out of the woods as far as this heatwave is concerned.’

Meanwhile, Met Office boss Paul Davies said the increasing heatwave temperatures may now occur once every five years – and annually by the end of the century.  

He told The Mirror: ‘When I started out as a ­forecaster, if someone had said in your lifetime you’ll see 40 degrees, I’d have said; ‘No, surely not!’.

‘We are in uncharted waters. We’re entering areas we’ve never experienced before and it’s not just the UK, it’s the planet as a whole.’

Meanwhile, a man has died after getting into difficulties in the sea at Humberston Fitties.

Humberside Police said officers were called to Humberston Fitties beach at around 4pm on Wednesday, August 10 following reports for a concern for safety. They found a man who as unconscious after coming into difficulty in the water.

Woman in her 80s dies after being pulled from the water at popular beach during heatwave, as man drowns off Lincolnshire beach

An elderly woman has died after she was pulled from the water at a beach in Essex during this week’s extreme heatwave. 

Essex Police said emergency services responded to concerns for the wellbeing of a pensioner at Walton Beach at 6.20pm on Wednesday August 10.

Despite the efforts of the public and paramedics the pensioner in her 80s died. 

A spokesperson from the Police said: ‘Her death is not being treated as suspicious and a file is being prepared for the coroner.

‘We want to thank the members of the public and partner agencies for their efforts responding to this incident.’

Elsewhere, a man has died after getting into difficulties in the sea at Humberston Fitties, in Lincolnshire. 

Humberside Police said officers were called at around 4pm on Wednesday, August 10 following reports for a concern for safety. They found a man who was unconscious after coming into difficulty in the water.

Coastguard, RNLI, ambulance crews and police all attended the scene. Humberside Police said CPR and lifesaving efforts were carried out by the lifeboat crew and paramedics, but the man was pronounced dead at the scene.

Coastguard, RNLI, ambulance crews and police all attended the scene. Humberside Police said CPR and lifesaving efforts were carried out by the lifeboat crew and paramedics, but the man was pronounced dead at the scene.

A Humberside Police spokesperson said: ‘Our thoughts are with man’s family and loved ones who were supported by officers on scene.’ The incident has been reported to HM Coroner, the spokesperson added.

A spokeswoman for Lincs and Notts Air Ambulance said: ‘Our LNAA crew attended an incident in the Humberston area yesterday (Wednesday 10 August 2022). The crew was flown to scene on board the helicopter, putting our doctor-paramedic team by the side of the patient in under 20 minutes.’

Families across the country are being warned to expect some uncomfortable nights, with temperatures unlikely to drop beyond the mid-to-high teens. 

It comes as the driest first seven months of the year in decades and hot spells have left parts of the UK facing looming drought, prompting hosepipe bans and warnings about the impact on agriculture, rivers and wildlife.

The latest analysis from the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (UKCEH) has warned that low or even exceptionally low river flows and groundwater levels are likely to continue for the next three months in southern England and Wales.

Mr Petagna said that rain could be on the horizon early next week, adding: ‘There are signs that we could get some rain next week, but details at the moment are uncertain,’ he said.

‘What we really need is a few weeks of light rain to soak into the ground. Thunderstorms are more likely to cause some flooding issues because the ground is hard the water can’t sink in.’

The water industry has said they are doing ‘everything possible’ to stop leakage but it remains a constant battle.

It comes after Tory frontrunner Liz Truss said there needs to be ‘tougher action’ on water companies as there ‘hasn’t been enough action to deal with leaky pipes’. 

Stuart Colville, director of policy at Water UK, has said it is a ‘constant battle’ to stop water leakage but that the water industry is doing ‘everything possible’ to do so.

Mr Colville said that it is looking ‘increasingly inevitable’ that the Environment Agency will declare a drought for England, adding this would be the ‘right decision given some of the pressure on the environment that we’re seeing at the moment.’

Pictured: A rare green field gets watered on Thursday at East Fen Farm in Soham, Cambridgeshire as the drought continues

Pictured: The East Fen Farm in Soham, Cambridgeshire has its own reservoir but that is now running low after the UK experienced its driest July since 1935

Pictured: A water irrigator at work in a field in Cambridge as the sun rises this morning amid increasing temperatures 

Pictured: One of Britain’s rare green fields gets watered on Thursday morning at East Fen Farm in Soham, Cambridgeshire

Pictured: A water irrigator at work in a field in Cambridge on Thursday. Temperatures keep rising this week with some areas expecting to reach in to the low to mid 30s

Pictured: A view of the low water levels at the United Utilities, Woodhead Reservoir, in Derbyshire

Pictured: Tinderbox Britain’s dry conditions continue their alarming effects at Bessom Bridge over Wimbleball Lake on Exmoor in Somerset

Pictured: London Underground Commuters on another hot day as people head into the capital on the jubilee line today 

The sun rises behind The Shard skyscraper as a second heatwave is predicted for parts of the country on Thursday

Our leaks shame: Thames Water is wasting 635m litres A DAY through leaky pipes… but bosses are STILL threatening to impose hosepipe ban

Britain’s biggest water company is threatening to impose a hosepipe ban despite failing to stop millions of litres of water leaking from its pipes.

Thames Water confessed yesterday to letting nearly a quarter of all water it supplies leak through cracks – but the firm’s strategy director said we needed to ‘be more efficient’ – like the Germans and Danes.

It said it is preparing to impose a hosepipe ban in the ‘next couple of weeks’, affecting 15million customers in London and the South East.

Environment Secretary George Eustice called in water company bosses yesterday to discuss the water crisis amid reports a state of drought could be declared.

Yorkshire Water confirmed it was also considering bringing in a hosepipe ban. Sources at the Environment Agency confirmed that Yorkshire, Anglian and South West Water are all considering hosepipe bans – which would place water restrictions on more than 32million people in England and Wales.

South East Water in Kent and Sussex, Southern Water in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight and Welsh Water have declared bans.

But Thames was forced to admit that while it was seeking a hosepipe ban it wastes more than 635million litres of water a day.

Cathryn Ross, strategy and regulatory affairs director at Thames Water told Radio 4’s Today: ‘In all probability we’ll be moving to introduce the hosepipe ban in the next couple of weeks.’

She confirmed leaks were endemic across Thames’s network.

She added: ‘We totally accept we need to do better on fixing leaks, that’s why we’re fixing more than 1,100 leaks every week. We are not where we need to be, we have a lot of work to do to fix Thames Water.’ She admitted it was likely that households would have to cut water use due to climate change.

‘We’re going to have to look at all the tools in the toolkit to make sure that we keep customers with taps flowing.’ But high usage of water was partly to blame.

‘We use 150 litres of water per person per day in England,’ she said. ‘In Germany it’s 120, in Copenhagen, where they’ve had a big push on this, it’s down to nearly 100.’

Water companies in Germany and Denmark are publicly owned. Germany also has a much better record of tackling leaking pipes than in the UK – with around 5 per cent of all water lost to leaks, compared with 20 per cent in the UK.

The Government wants leaks cut to 10 per cent by 2050. Yorkshire Water confirmed it was considering a hosepipe ban after reservoir levels fell below 50 per cent, 20 per cent lower than usual.

The Environment Secretary met water company bosses yesterday.

Mr Eustice said: ‘All water companies have reassured me that water supplies remain resilient across the country. Each company has a pre-agreed drought plan which they are following.’

He added: ‘We are better prepared than ever before.’

The Angling Trust wants water companies to stop dragging their feet and order hosepipe bans.

Trust policy chief Martin Salter said: ‘Millions of gallons of scarce water is being wasted keeping golf courses and lawns green rather than helping rivers survive and our wildlife and economy protected.’

 

An Oxfordshire village has also become the first in Britain to run dry, with residents forced to rely on deliveries of bottled and tanker water.

Northend, on the Buckinghamshire border, usually gets its water from the now dried-up Stokenchurch Reservoir.

Thames Water had to send water tankers and bottles to its residents, struggling after high demand on the natural resource in recent hot weeks. 

The company has also recently announced it will be issuing a hosepipe ban for 15million customers across London, Surrey and Gloucestershire in the coming weeks.

A Thames Water spokesperson told MailOnline: ‘We’re sorry to customers in the Stokenchurch area who are experiencing lower pressure than normal due to technical issues with our Stokenchurch reservoir. 

‘We have a team on site working hard to resolve this as soon as possible and the situation is improving and supplies have been restored to customers.

‘We’re using tankers to help boost supplies to customers in Northend to keep up water pressures for these customers so they do not see supply issues as well as delivering water bottles.

‘Customers may experience lower than normal pressure during periods of higher demand. 

‘These times are typically in the morning and during the early evening.

‘We’ve also identified everyone in the affected area who has pre-registered with us as having special requirements, such as being medically reliant on water, so we can get in touch and make sure we give them the help and support they need.

‘We realise how inconvenient this is, especially during such hot weather, and appreciate customers’ patience as we work to resolve things’

Last night Andrew Sells, head of Natural England between 2014 and 2019, accused water companies of selling off reservoirs which could have helped ease drought to housing developers.

‘Several of our water companies preferred to build houses on some of their reservoirs, and last week we learned that together they have built precisely zero new reservoirs in the past 30 years’, he wrote in the Daily Telegraph.

‘No doubt some reservoirs had reached the end of their working lives, but in abandoning this infrastructure, without any replacements, they have again put short-term profits ahead of long-term supply.’

The Met Office also predicted the extreme heat will become more commonplace in the coming years as global warming continues.

Professor Hannah Cloke, Professor of Hydrology at the University of Reading, said: ‘The warnings for extreme heat from both the Met Office and the heat health alert issued by the UK Health Security Agency are another reminder that this summer in the UK is proving to be lethally hot.

‘Compared to the July record-breaking heat, this event will be less intense but last longer, which could actually have a greater impact on people’s health.

‘This heatwave might not break any records for maximum temperatures, but it might actually cause more deaths.’

Climate change is making heatwaves more intense, frequent and likely, with last month’s record temperatures made at least 10 times more likely because of global warming and ‘virtually impossible’ without it, research shows.

Scientists also warn the likelihood of droughts occurring is becoming higher due to climate change, driven by greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels and other human activities.

Government minister Paul Scully said it is ‘always sensible’ for people to conserve water, when asked about the possibility of a hosepipe ban for London.

He added: ‘But we’ll look carefully because the whole point about London and the South East is that the more development you have and the less rainfall there is, then obviously there’s less to go around and we’ve got to be careful.’

Pictured: Portobello beach, a few miles from Edinburgh city centre, was busy with sunseekers on Thursday as temperatures hit the high twenties

A woman covers her head from the scorching sun on a small green grass patch to enjoy her lunch break in London today

A woman was pictured walking near Big Ben in London today as heatwaves and prolonged dry weather are damaging landscapes, gardens and wildlife, the National Trust has warned

Pictured: An aerial view of the scorched harvest during the heatwave in Scampton, Lincolnshire, on Thursday 

What is your water company doing to cope with the dry weather? 

The National Drought Group – made up of Government and agency officials, water companies and other groups such as the National Farmers’ Union (NFU) – is set to meet tomorrow to discuss the prolonged dry weather

Four water companies have announced hosepipe bans in the UK as another heatwave scorches the country.

Thames Water was the latest to say it expects to implement a temporary usage ban (TUB) in the coming weeks due to the dry weather.

Here are each water company’s current guidelines concerning hosepipe bans and water usage across the UK, alongside water leakage statistics for those based in England and Wales:

Anglian Water 

Area: East of England and Hartlepool

Customers: Six million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 86 litres

A spokesman said: ‘We have no hosepipe bans currently in place across our region and we’re working hard to keep it that way, but we’re watching river levels very closely right now as things can change quickly and the forecast for this month remains dry and warm.’

Welsh Water (Dwr Cymru)

Area: Most of Wales and parts of western England on the border with Wales

Customers: Three million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 116 litres

The company has introduced a hosepipe ban for customers in the region of Pembrokeshire and a small part of Carmarthenshire, which will come into effect on August 19.

The TUB will be in place ‘until we have had enough rain to replenish our water resources’.

Hafren Dyfrdwy

Area: North-east and mid-Wales

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 134 litres

The water provider does not currently have any restrictions in place but has not ruled out implementing ‘joint policies’ along with the Welsh government should the situation with the dry weather worsen.

A spokesman said: ‘Whilst we don’t have any concerns about raw water position for Hafren Dyfrdwy, we continue to monitor the situation and are a part of the Welsh Government’s Taskforce, working closely with them to create joint policies and processes in the event of drought action.’

Northumbrian Water

Customers: 2.7 million

Area: Northumberland, Tyne and Wear, Durham and parts of North Yorkshire

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 110 litres

The website says there are ‘no plans in place to implement any drought measures such as hosepipe bans’, but adds it is ‘good practice’ to use water wisely.

Severn Trent Water

Area: From the Bristol Channel to the Humber and from mid-Wales to the East Midlands

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 112 litres

The region covered by Severn Trent Water currently has no hosepipe bans in place.

However, the company said it will continue to monitor reservoir levels and demand for water ‘closely’, as it does every year, for any changes.

South West Water

Area: Devon, Cornwall, parts of Dorset and Somerset

Customers: 1.7 million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 118 litres

South West water customers are at risk of ‘formal restrictions’ being introduced over the coming weeks.

The last water restriction in the region was in 1996, but the company said on August 3 it may have to make the ‘difficult decision’ to introduce restrictions ‘if the exceptional levels of demand and sustained dry weather continues’.

Southern Water

Area: The south-west of England, including Dorset, Somerset, Bristol, most of Wiltshire and parts of Gloucestershire and Hampshire

Customers: 2.5 million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 87 litres

A hosepipe ban has been in place for customers in Hampshire and on the Isle of Wight since August 5.

The company has applied for a Drought Permit on the River Test from the Environment Agency to allow them to continue to ‘take water if levels continue to drop’.

Thames Water

Area: London and the Thames Valley

Customers: 15 million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 161 litres

Thames Water said it is planning to issue a hosepipe ban in the coming weeks ‘given the long term forecast’ of hot and dry weather for the region.

It added: ‘The timing is not confirmed due to a number of operational and legal procedural requirements but we will be updating our customers, partners, regulators and stakeholders at the earliest time to ensure a co-ordinated approach.

‘In the meantime, we continue to urge our customers to only use what they need for their essential use.’

United Utilities

Area: The North West in a region from Crewe to Carlisle

Customers: More than three million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 130 litres

A company spokesman told the PA news agency it is ‘not considering any restrictions on use’ of water at present but did encourage customers to use water wisely.

Wessex Water

Area: The South West including Dorset, Somerset, Bristol, and parts of Wiltshire, Gloucestershire and Hampshire

Customers: 2.8 million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 111 litres

No hosepipe bans are planned by Wessex Water but the company does warn that reservoir and groundwater levels are low and urges customers to ‘use water responsibly’.

Yorkshire Water

Area: West Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, the East Riding of Yorkshire, part of North Lincolnshire, most of North Yorkshire and part of Derbyshire

Customers: More than five million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 130 litres

A spokesman said: ‘We haven’t applied for any drought orders or implemented TUBs. They do both form part of our drought plan and so they are tools that we could call on if/when we need to.’

On its website, the firm said there is not currently a hosepipe ban in place but it ‘can never rule it out. It’s been a really dry year, so we all need to save water where we can.’

Affinity Water

Area: Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Surrey and other parts of the South East

Customers: 3.83 million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 120 litres

Parts of the South East covered by Affinity Water are ‘unlikely’ to see any hosepipe ban this year.

The company’s website says: ‘At current levels, it’s unlikely we’ll need to introduce restrictions this year.’

Bristol Water

Area: Bristol city, north east Somerset and south Gloucestershire

Customers: More than 500,000

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 69 litres

At the end of July, the company said: ‘We will continue to monitor the situation, but with our current water resource outlook we do not foresee any issues in supply to customers.’

Portsmouth Water

Area: Portsmouth and the surrounding area

Customers: 698,000

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 79 litres

Despite Southern Water issuing a temporary usage ban for nearby Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, Portsmouth Water reassured customers on Twitter on Tuesday ‘there is no hosepipe ban in the Portsmouth Water area of supply’.

It added: ‘But please, please, please use water responsibly! We’re all in this together.’

South East Water

Area: The south-east of England, including Eastbourne, Maidenhead and North Kent

Customers: 2.2 million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 99 litres

A hosepipe ban will come into force on Friday for customers in Kent and Sussex.

The company announced: ‘We have been left with no choice but to restrict the use of hosepipes and sprinklers from 12.01am on Friday August 12 within our Kent and Sussex supply area until further notice.’

On its website, South East Water said: ‘We are taking this step to ensure we have enough water for both essential use and to protect the environment.

‘This will enable us to also reduce the amount of water we need to take from already stressed local water sources.’

South Staffs Water

Area: West Midlands, South Staffordshire, South Derbyshire, North Warwickshire and North Worcestershire

Customers: 1.3 million

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 111 litres

Head of water strategy and environment Natalie Akroyd said: ‘With the recent hot weather and less-than-average rainfall for this time of year, we continue to monitor our water resources and encourage our customers to use water wisely.

‘We currently don’t have any plans in place to introduce hosepipe bans.’

SES Water

Area: Parts of Surrey, Kent and south London

Customers: 745,000

Leakage per property per day in 2020/2021: 82 litres

SES Water wholesale director Tom Kelly said: ‘The prolonged dry weather, coupled with higher demand for water, continues to affect our levels of resources, which are less than we’d expect for this time of year.

‘85% of our supplies come from groundwater resources, which is water stored in aquifers underground, and the remaining 15% is abstracted from rivers into our Bough Beech reservoir in Kent.

‘These resources are refilled by rainwater between October to April and so, unlike some other water companies, we don’t rely on summer rainfall to replenish.

‘We’ll be monitoring rainfall levels during the winter months, as that’s when our groundwater sources refill, in case restrictions need to be brought in next spring.

‘While they have still been affected by the dry weather, it’s the increase in demand for water that’s the main cause for the decline in water resource levels.

‘Customers playing their part to save water is helping us from having to introduce restrictions.

‘We continue to closely monitor our resources on a daily basis and won’t rule out bringing in a hosepipe ban if we feel it is required.

‘In the meantime, we’re asking customers to keep using water responsibly, as we play our part to keep leakage as low as we can, and together we can make sure there’s enough for everyone this summer.’

Scottish Water

A Scottish Water spokesman told PA there were no plans for water usage restrictions in Scotland.

He added: ‘We are monitoring and managing our water resources and, in some instances, reservoirs are being topped up from alternative water sources to ensure supply resilience for customers.’

Northern Ireland Water

A spokesman for Northern Ireland Water said: ‘The amount of water in our impounding reservoirs is kept under continuous review and we are content with our current level of storage. However, it is imperative that customers continue to use water wisely, especially given the forecast for the next number of days.

‘At this point in time, NI Water is not introducing a hosepipe ban. The situation is, however, being closely monitored and if storage reduces significantly or demand became excessive, NI Water would have to consider the possibility of putting in place measures in order to protect water supplies.’

Water leakage information was compiled by the information dashboard Discover Water and is based on information agreed by water companies, the water regulators, the UK and Welsh Governments and the Consumer Council for Water.

 

Saharan Britain: Aerial views of England show scorched earth as parts of the UK resemble a desert after fields and trees turn brown in heatwave 

Shocking aerial shots have revealed the impact of the sizzling heatwave leaving farmers with parched crops as half of the UK population could be facing a hosepipe ban within weeks. 

These alarming photographs showed vast desert-like landscapes in areas that would normally be filled with swathes of greenery as the country endured its driest July since 1935 and record-breaking temperatures of 40C (104F).

Patches of scorched grass could be seen right across the countryside in photographs taken surrounding East Midlands Airport as concerns grow over water shortages thanks to rising temperatures.

The Met Office has also raised its Fire Severity Index to exceptional – the highest level – today for much of southern England, and Wales alongside an amber, as the mercury is forecast to climb to ‘lethally hot’ temperatures of 36C (97F) this weekend. The warning system also been at its second highest level of alert for seven weeks, which is the longest stretch since 1976. 

It comes as several households in parts of Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire are facing water shortages after a pipe burst on Thursday and the Stokenchurch Reservoir dried-up. 

Thames Water confessed yesterday to letting nearly a quarter of all water it supplies leak through cracks – but the firm’s strategy director said we needed to ‘be more efficient’ – like the Germans and Danes.

It said it is preparing to impose a hosepipe ban in the ‘next couple of weeks’, affecting 15million customers in London and the South East.

These alarming aerial photographs showed vast desert-like landscapes in areas that would normally be filled with swathes of greenery as the country endured its driest July since 1935 and record-breaking temperatures of 40C (104F) 

Brits in Oxfordshire (pictured) and Milton Keynes were pictured using umbrellas to shield themselves from the sun on Wednesday while they played golf on a bone dry course

An image of scorched Britain was captured yesterday and showed how the ongoing drought conditions have effected the country

Patches of scorched grass could be seen right across the countryside in photographs taken surrounding East Midlands Airport as concerns grow over water shortages thanks to rising temperatures

Pictured: Golfers are seen playing on a scorched course as the UK enters another sizzling heatwave

Pictured: Cows are pictured eating straw and grass silage, which is normally a winter feed, at a farm in Harpole, near Northampton

Pictured: An alarming aerial view of a dried out grass outfield during a T20 Last Man Stands cricket match

Environment Secretary George Eustice called in water company bosses yesterday to discuss the water crisis amid reports a state of drought could be declared.

Yorkshire Water confirmed it was also considering bringing in a hosepipe ban. Sources at the Environment Agency confirmed that Yorkshire, Anglian and South West Water are all considering hosepipe bans – which would place water restrictions on more than 32million people in England and Wales.

South East Water in Kent and Sussex, Southern Water in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight and Welsh Water have declared bans.

But Thames was forced to admit that while it was seeking a hosepipe ban it wastes more than 635million litres of water a day.

Cathryn Ross, strategy and regulatory affairs director at Thames Water told Radio 4’s Today: ‘In all probability we’ll be moving to introduce the hosepipe ban in the next couple of weeks.’

She confirmed leaks were endemic across Thames’s network.

Andrew Sells, head of Natural England between 2014 and 2019, accused water companies of selling off reservoirs which could have helped ease drought to housing developers.

‘Several of our water companies preferred to build houses on some of their reservoirs, and last week we learned that together they have built precisely zero new reservoirs in the past 30 years’, he wrote in the Daily Telegraph.

‘No doubt some reservoirs had reached the end of their working lives, but in abandoning this infrastructure, without any replacements, they have again put short-term profits ahead of long-term supply.’

Pictured: Sunseekers walk near the low water levels at Baitings Reservoir in Ripponden, West Yorkshire as water company bosses are being urged to impose a England-wide hosepipe ban to avoid the worst effects of drought on rivers and wildlife

Pictured: Arid areas of land in South East London as the hot weather continues and threats of hose pipe bans may come into force

Pictured: Dried out ground in a park, following a long period of little rainfall and hot weather in St Albans

Firefighters bring a field fire under control near Ashford in Kent as the Met Office raised its Fire Severity Index to exceptional – the highest level – today for much of southern England, and Wales

The sports grounds at a Cambridge University college remain dry and dusty following weeks of exceptional hot weather in Britain. Drone photos show the parched cricket pitch and tennis courts

Scorched fairways at the Links Golf Club in Newmarket, as Britain is braced for another heatwave that is set to last longer than July’s record-breaking hot spell

An aerial view of the historic Iron Age hill fort of Maiden Castle at Dorchester in Dorset where the grass has been scorched by the hot summer sunshine and drought conditions

The companies which have sold off decommissioned reservoirs in recent years include Thames Water, Severn Trent and Southern Water.  

Meanwhile, the Woodhead Reservoir in the Peak District has seen a drop in water levels over the last few days.

Photos taken at the Dernford Reservoir near Cambridgeshire also show low water levels as water companies struggle to meet demand.

Nearby, the River Granta is still flowing but at much lower levels than usual.

Last month it was reported that the river was at a lowly 5cm, despite previously sitting at more than one metre.

More than SIXTY per cent of Europe is under drought warning as the Rhine runs dry and is set to become impassable to crucial coal barges with Europe on course to suffer worst drought in 500 YEARS 

By Charlotte McLaughlin and Jack Newman for MailOnline 

More than half of Europe is now under a warning for drought that is on course to become its worst in 500 years as Germany’s most-important river is running dry.

The latest European Drought Observatory data, published today, shows that a total of sixty-four percent of the land in the EU and United Kingdom is now under a drought warning or alert.

According to the latest map of the Combined Drought Indicator, which is based on July data, 47 per cent of the territory is in ‘warning’ conditions which means there is a deficit of moisture in the soil, and 17 per cent is in alert conditions where vegetation is stressed.

The map shows that the places that are experiencing the most drought include the UK, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Italy, Hungary, Poland and Romania. While the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology predicts ‘exceptionally low’ flow levels in rivers until October.

The news comes as water levels in the Rhine are now so low that it could become impassable to barges later this week, threatening vital supplies of oil and coal. 

Wildfires are also spreading again throughout France, torching an area that was already badly-hit as temperatures soared to record levels last month, and there have also been fears food production will fall well below average.

Bone dry: Almost half of EU land is currently under a drought warning or worse because of a combination of heatwaves and a ‘wide and persistent’ lack of rain, experts have warned. A map (pictured) reveals the countries most at risk. Areas in orange are under ‘warning’ conditions, while 15 per cent of land has moved into the most severe ‘alert’ state (shown in red)

The Rhine river – Germany’s most-important waterway – is running so low that it may soon become impassable to barges, threatening huge economic damage

The droughts are not only affecting Germany, with Spain, southern France, Portugal and most of Italy suffering from the shortages

A firefighters tries to extinguishe a wildfire in the Sameiro village near the town of Manteigas in Portugal today which has been raging since Saturday 

The Rhine – which carries 80 per cent of all goods transported by water in Germany, from its industrial heartlands to Dutch ports – are now so low that it could become impassable to barges later this week, threatening vital supplies of oil and coal that the country is relying upon as Russia turns off the gas tap.

The river is already lower now than it was at the same point in 2018, when Europe suffered its last major drought. That year, the river ended up closing to goods vessels for 132 days, almost triggering a recession. Costs to transport goods by river this year have already risen five-fold as barges limit their capacity to stay afloat.

Economists estimate the disruption could knock as much as half a percentage point off Germany’s overall economic growth this year, with experts warning the country was facing recession due to an energy crisis even before the drought hit.

Andrea Toreti, senior researcher at the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, said: ‘We haven’t analysed fully [this] event, but based on my experience I think that this is perhaps even more extreme than in 2018.

‘2018 was so extreme that looking back at this list of the last 500 years, there were no other events similar.’

The EU’s climate monitoring agency Copernicus said on Monday: ‘Europe experienced dry conditions during most of July, with much of the continent seeing rainfall and, in particular, soil moisture well below average (see below). 

‘The month began with conditions already dry, following a drier-than-average June over the UK, Ireland, Italy and most of the Iberian Peninsula, in addition to a large region stretching from the northern Balkans across eastern Europe and to north-western Russia.’

It said in the lead up to July’s heatwave it’ repeatedly warned of increased fire danger due to the lack of rain and the resulting dry vegetation, combined with high temperatures’ and this has resulted in wildfire activity records in July being broken. 

Since Tuesday, the so-called Landiras blaze in Gironde – near Bordeaux – has burned 15,000 acres of pine forest and forced the evacuation of almost 6,000 people.

‘The fire is extremely violent and has spread to the Landes department’ further south, home of the Landes de Gascogne regional park, the prefecture said in a statement. Local authorities of the wine-growing Gironde department said 500 firefighters were mobilised.

The prefecture warned the fire was spreading toward the A63 motorway, a major artery linking Bordeaux to Spain.

Speed limits on the highway have been lowered to 55 mph in case smoke starts to limit visibility, and a full closure could be ordered if the fire worsens and continues to spread.

The Landiras fire that ignited in July was the largest of several that have raged this year in southwest France, which like the rest of Europe has been buffeted by record drought and a series of heat waves over the past two months.

Fires were also raging on Tuesday in other parts of the country.

One broke out in the southern departments of Lozere and Aveyron, where close to 600 hectares have already burnt and where Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin is due to go later in the day.

Another fire is in the Maine et Loire department in western France, where 1,600 acres have been scorched and 500 are threatened, according to local authorities.

According to CNN, there are also fears for food production in the EU amid the heat and the war in Ukraine which is already pushing up the cost of good throughout the EU. The Joint Research Centre, the European Commission’s science service, said in a recent report that it believe production of grain maize, sunflowers and soybeans will drop by 8-9%, well below the five-year average, due to sweltering conditions. 

Copernicus Senior Scientist Freja Vamborg said that ‘dry conditions from previous months combined with high temperatures and low precipitation rates seen in many areas during July may have adverse effects on agricultural production and other industries such as river transport and energy production.’ 

Weeks of dry weather have turned several of Europe’s major waterways into trickles, posing a headache for German factories and power plants that rely on deliveries by ship.

‘This is particularly the case for the Rhine, whose nautical bottleneck at Kaub has very low water levels but which remains navigable for ships with small drafts,’ said Tim Alexandrin, a spokesman for Germany’s Transport Ministry.

Authorities predict that water levels at Kaub will dip below the mark of 40 centimetres early on Friday and keep falling over the weekend.

While this is still higher than the record low of 27cm seen in October 2018, many large ships could struggle to safely pass the river at that spot, located roughly mid-way along the Rhine between Koblenz and Mainz.

‘The situation is quite dramatic, but not as dramatic yet as in 2018,’ said Christian Lorenz, a spokesman for the German logistics company HGK.

Due to the lack of water ships bringing salt down the river from Heilbronn to Cologne that would normally carry 2,200 metric tonnes of cargo are currently only able to transport about 600 tonnes, he said.

Four fire engines have been sent to the scene in Kent today, and crews are using hose reel jets and beaters to extinguish the flames. People living or working nearby are being advised to keep windows and doors closed as a precaution due to smoke

‘Of course we hope that shipping won’t be halted, but we saw in 2018 that when water levels got very low the gas stations suddenly had no more fuel because ships couldn’t get through,’ said Mr Lorenz.

Authorities are taking steps to shift more goods traffic onto the rail network and, if necessary, give it priority, said Mr Alexandrin, the Transport Ministry spokesman.

Meanwhile, HGK and other shipping companies are preparing for a ‘new normal’ in which low levels such as those seen this year become more common as global warming makes droughts more severe, sapping water along the length of the Rhine from the Swiss Alps to the North Sea.

‘There’s no denying climate change and the industry is adjusting to it,’ said Mr Lorenz.

In some places the Rhine was so shallow that other vessels were moored far below the quays where people walk. Signs warning people about dangerously high waters stuck out of the riverbed, and rocks lay exposed.

The resulting bottlenecks are another drag on Europe’s largest economy, which is grappling with high inflation, supply chain disruptions and soaring gas prices after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February.

People walk around the remains of the church of Sant Roma de Sau as it emerges from the low waters of the Sau Reservoir, north of Barcelona, Spain

The droughts are not only affecting Germany, with Spain, southern France, Portugal and most of Italy suffering from the shortages with ministers imposing emergency water restrictions. 

The European Drought Observatory said 15 per cent of the bloc is on red alert due to crops suffering from ‘severe water deficiency.’ 

As many as 95 French regions have brought in hosepipe bans, while 62 are at a ‘crisis level’ that only allows the use of water for essential needs.

More than 100 French towns have no running drinking water and are being supplied with special deliveries.

In Andalusia, one of Europe’s hottest and driest regions, paddle-boats and waterslides lie abandoned on the cracked bed of Vinuela reservoir which is now 87 per cent empty.

A prolonged dry spell and extreme heat made July the hottest month in Spain since at least 1961. Spanish reservoirs are at just 40 per cent of capacity on average in early August, well below the ten-year average of around 60 per cent, official data shows.

Meanwhile, a flooded Portuguese village dating back to the first century has reemerged from the depths with its stony foundations still intact as a result of the drought.

Vilarinho da Furna in Braga, northern Portugal, was intentionally submerged by the state in 1971 to build a reservoir, now bearing the same name, on the Homem River.

Every summer, the forgotten village reappears and becomes a popular attraction, with locals and tourists walking along the ruins that have been underwater for 50 years.

But this year, more of the village has been uncovered due to the sweltering heat that has suffocated Europe this summer.

Locals say that 70 per cent of the former granite houses are now visible.

The guardian of Vilarinho da Furna, António Barroso, told Renascença that: ‘Since 2009, the water has not gone down as it is now.’ 

The village had an unusual communitarian social system in which each family had a member on the council, known as the Junta.

The practice is believed to date back to the Visigoths and the leader of the Junta was chosen among the married men of the village, and they would serve for six months. 

The Junta would discuss important local issues such as harvesting, transport, cattle herding and trapping wolves to maintain the self-sustaining community.

The Junta was also responsible for judging crimes and imposing punishments, which could lead to exclusions from Vilarinho da Furna, meaning they would not receive any of the benefits of the communitarian system.

The village used to house 300 people who were forced to relocate to neighbouring towns in 1970.

The 57 families of the Geresian town left the stones houses as they were before the water drained their properties.

There had been strong resistance to the dam among the villagers but they were unable to stop the government who offered them compensation for the forced relocation. 

Since Tuesday, the so-called Landiras blaze has burned 15,000 acres of pine forest and forced the evacuation of almost 6,000 people in an area already hit last month by huge blazes. No one has been injured in the coastal area that draws huge summer tourism crowds, but 16 houses were destroyed near the village of Belin-Beliet

Visitors have to access the village via a dirt road that also leads to three river beaches in the area run by the Association of Former Inhabitants of Vilarinho da Furna (AFURNA).

During the drought, authorities have been able to clean the standing pillars and structures normally covered by the reservoir.

AFURNA charges entrance to the village during the summer weeks in order to maintain it and prevent hordes of crowds ruining the buildings.

Barroso, the 77-year-old guardian of the village, is responsible for two thousands hectares in the area.

Meanwhile wildfires also hit Montenegro where the army had to be called into extinguish a forest blaze during the heatwave. 

Pictures show a Montenegrin army helicopter scooping water from an improvised pool while it helps to extinguish a forest fire, over the touristy area of Boka Bay in the city of Risan today. 

A wildfire that broke out on Saturday is also still raging in the natural park of Serra da Estrela in central Portugal. 

The Sameiro village near the town of Manteigas is near the site of the blaze which has spread across mountainous and forest area. 

 

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