Fraudsters pounce on frustrated writer’s angry Tweet to Barclays

Fraudsters pounce on frustrated writer’s angry Tweet to Barclays to convince him they work for bank and persuade him to send them £8,000

  • Mike Tinmouth complained via Twitter about the delays on his Barclays account  
  • He posted a letter of correspondence from the bank believing it unprofessional 
  • Fraudsters monitoring the Twitter thread were then able to pose as the bank  
  • Mimicking the bank and with knowledge of his case, Mr Tinmouth was taken it 

A Barclays customer was tricked into transferring £8,000 by fraudsters posing as his banks’ customer service department, following a disgruntled Twitter post. 

Mike Tinmouth was left furious with the process and time it had taken to open a business account with Barclays.

The writer took to Twitter to express his anger in a public tweet, which was seized on by lurking fraudsters who posed as his bank in a bid to con him out of his savings. 

Barclays customer Tim Monmouth, who posted an angry Tweet, was targeted by online criminals who used information online along with details of his complaint to try to fleece him of £8,000. The writer took to Twitter to express his anger in a public tweet, which was seized on by lurking fraudsters who posed as his bank in a bid to con him out of his savings

Mr Tinmouth had wanted to open the business account to deal with his income and outgoings on some of the properties he was letting to tenants.

But after applying to Barclays, he became frustrated at the drawn-out process and eventually complained on Twitter. 

Fraudsters targetted Mr Tinmouth after he posted an email that he received from the bank which he felt was unprofessional and wanted to confirm was genuine. 


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The subsequently bank urged him to delete this public post because of the sensitive date available to others.

But the amount of information along with some readily available information about Mr Tinmouth online was enough for the criminals to pose as the bank and appear to know details of the case.

‘They targeted me because they are monitoring the big banks’ customer support Twitter channels where they can get enough information on name, location, and photo to then be able to track down further information,’ Mr Tinmouth told the BBC.

Mr Tinmouth had wanted to open the business account to deal with his income and outgoings on some of the properties he was letting to tenants. But after applying to Barclays, he became frustrated at the drawn-out process and eventually complained on Twitter

Shortly after the Twitter exchange, he received another email, this time apologising for poor service and offering to deal with his case. However, this was the fraudsters posing as the bank. 

Eventually he was provided with details of his ‘new’ account, and began to transfer his savings from his personal account with a different bank.

The transfer was blocked, saving Mr Tinmouth from losing the £8,000 he intended to store away for savings.

Barclays’s website encourages customers to be careful about posting sensitive details online, and a spokesman said customers should never transfer money to a new account without having all the relevant paperwork and access to the account.     

‘In this case, we advised Mr Tinmouth on the process he should follow to speak to us about his query. However while we were in contact, he engaged with an unverified email address and provided personal information to scammers, which led to him being targeted,’ a spokesman said. 

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