Fury as Nazi memorabilia is on sale inside former C of E church

Fury as Nazi memorabilia including SS medals and trousers made by Jews in Auschwitz with £600 price tag are on sale inside former C of E church

  • Nazi knives and trophies also on show at St Gregory’s Antiques and Collectables
  • Display in disused medieval church in Norwich near Christmas gifts for children
  • But woman whose relatives were murdered at Belsen was ‘appalled’ by display
  • She called it ‘deeply offensive’ and angrily confronted shop owner on Sunday

Nazi memorabilia including SS medals and trousers made by Jews at Auschwitz with a £600 price tag have gone on sale inside a former Church of England church.

Knives and other trophies were also on show at St Gregory’s Antiques and Collectables, which rents space in a disused medieval church in Norwich.

But local resident Ellen Nierop, whose relatives were murdered at Belsen, was ‘appalled’ when she saw the items after attending a Remembrance Day service.

Nazi memorabilia has gone on sale inside a former Church of England church in Norwich

St Gregory’s Antiques and Collectables rents space in the disused medieval church in Norwich

In the shop – once a house linked to a medieval church – sellers pay a fee to rent the cabinets

She called it ‘deeply offensive’ and angrily confronted the owner of the shop on Sunday over the display, which was a few feet from Christmas gifts for children.

Ms Nierop claimed the owner told her the reminders of Adolf Hitler’s crimes were being sold on behalf of a Polish man and she should leave if she felt offended.


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She said the owner also told her that the Second World War memorabilia was of ‘historic value’ and collectors would love them.

But Ms Nierop said: ‘It’s an insult to everyone. They were one of the biggest mass murderers in history.

The display cabinets are near where the altar once stood at St Gregory’s in Norwich

The church in Norwich, which stands between Pottergate and St Benedict’s Street, is medieval

An arts centre on the site closed in 2012, before it became an antiques centre the next year

The Grade I listed building in the city is managed by the Norwich Historic Churches Trust

‘There would be a massive outcry if it was Ian Huntley, Fred West or the Islamic State instead. But the fact is the far right is growing in this country.’

Antiques are on sale near where altar stood

The display cabinets are near where the altar once stood in St Gregory’s, a Grade I listed redundant Church of England parish church in Norwich.

The church, which stands between Pottergate and St Benedict’s Street, is medieval. Some was rebuilt in the 14th century, though the tower is older.

St Gregory’s is noted for its wall-paintings, which include a depiction of St George and the dragon at the west end of the north aisle.

There is a public passageway under the chancel, which was rebuilt in 1394. The building is managed by the Norwich Historic Churches Trust.

After being made redundant as a parish church, it was used as an arts centre, which closed in September 2012. The following year it was leased out for use as an antiques centre.

The trousers were on sale for £600, and the display cabinet also contained SS war trophies, knives and stamps.

In the antiques shop – once a house linked to a medieval church – sellers pay a fee to rent the cabinets.

Ms Nierop said: ‘I decided to pop into St Gregory’s to get some Christmas stuff on my way back through the city.

‘I walked inside and on the right were children’s games and on the left Nazi memorabilia and I was horrified and deeply offended.

‘My relatives were Dutch Jews executed in Belsen, and once I saw the display I took it very personally as it’s a whole family line that was wiped out that I never got to know.

‘He said the items were of historic value and people collect them – which is true. But considering the climate right now, it’s very inappropriate, as I’d also been at an anti-fascist demonstration in Norwich on Saturday.’

The owner has so far refused to comment, and further calls to his shop by MailOnline were unanswered today. 

The shop posted a Remembrance tribute on Sunday on its Facebook page, saying: ‘We give thanks for those that fought to save us.’ 

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