Thieves steal 500-year-old mill stone so heavy it takes two to lift it

Thieves steal 500-year-old mill stone so heavy it takes two to lift it from 13th century castle

  • A 500-year-old mill stone used for grinding wheat and grains stolen from castle
  • Stone, which featured in TV series Outlander, stolen from Aberdour Castle, Fife
  • Police said it would have taken at least two people to lift the stone away 

Thieves stole a 500-year-old mill stone which is so heavy it takes two people to lift it from a 13th century castle. 

The historic artefact, which would have been used for grinding wheat or other grains, was stolen from Aberdour Castle in Easter Aberdour, Fife.

Cops are probing the theft of the 16th century mill stone, which featured in hit TV series Outlander, between March 17 and 18 and said it would take at least two people to lift it.

The 500-year-old mill stone (pictured), which was used for grinding wheat and grains, was stolen from Aberdour Castle in Easter Aberdour, Fife

The castle is one of the oldest in Scotland and plays the part of the Benedictine monastery in Outlander.

A Police Scotland spokesperson said: ‘Sadly, despite our checks, the issues at Aberdour Castle continue.

‘This 500-year-old mill stone was stolen from there between 12pm on 17/03 and 10am on 18/03. It would take at least two people to lift it.’

It comes after a spree of anti-social behaviour in the area.

Aberdour Castle (pictured) is one of the oldest in Scotland and plays the part of the Benedictine monastery in Outlander

Cops reported ‘damage’ at the 13th century castle, which is maintained by Historic Environment Scotland, two weeks ago.

Chief Inspector Yvonne Stenhouse said: ‘We are aware of ongoing issues with youths engaging in anti-social behaviour which is concerning, particularly in the midst of a pandemic when people are being told to stay at home.

‘Local officers are working with partners to address these issues and proactively stop this activity.

‘I would urge anyone with information or concerns regarding anti-social behaviour to contact Police Scotland through 101 or speak to officers out on patrol.’

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