Thousands of flaming torches light up the Tower Of London’s moat

At the going down of the sun… Thousands of flaming torches light up the Tower Of London’s moat in awe-inspiring tribute to fallen heroes of World War One

  • A Beefeater guard began the lighting ceremony by bringing a flame down from the tower to the moat
  • Dozens of representatives of the armed forces and volunteers then ignited thousands of torches
  • The ceremony was accompanied by specially commissioned sound installation as well as words from war poet Mary Borden’s Sonnets To A Soldier
  • Beyond The Deepening Shadow, will be repeated each night until the final showing on Remembrance Sunday

Around 10,000 flames have filled the empty moat encircling the Tower of London in an awe-inspiring tribute to mark the centenary of the end of the First World War.

Yeoman warders, also known as Beefeaters, began the lighting ceremony this evening by bringing a flame down from the tower into the moat, which had been submerged in smoke.

Dozens of representatives from the armed forces and volunteers then used the flame to ignite thousands of other torches staked into or placed on the ground underneath the tower, bathing the barren moat in light.

The success of the 2014 display of poppies at the tower meant Historic Royal Palaces, who maintain the landmark, were keen to mark the centenary of Armistice. The ceremony, named Beyond The Deepening Shadow, will be repeated each night until the final showing on Remembrance Sunday

Volunteers help to light first thousands of flames in the dry moat of the Tower of London as part of an installation called Beyond the Deepening Shadow: The Tower Remembers, to mark the centenary of the end of First World War

Yeoman Warders (ÔBeefeatersÕ) lighting the first of thousands of flames in a lighting ceremony in the dry moat of the Tower of London as part of an installation called Beyond the Deepening Shadow: The Tower Remembers, to mark the centenary of the end of the First World War

A man plays a bugle to signify the start of a minute of silence ahead of the torches being lit for the installation ‘Beyond the Deepening Shadow’ at The Tower of London

Yeoman Warders, commonly known as ‘Beefeaters’ light the first of thousands of flames in a lighting ceremony in the dry moat of the Tower of London on November 4, 2018, as part of an installation called ‘Beyond the Deepening Shadow: The Tower Remembers’

Yeoman of the Guard lights the first torches in the installation ‘Beyond The Deepening Shadow’ at Tower of London this evening

The moat of the Tower of London are seen filled with thousands of lit torches as part of the installation ‘Beyond the Deepening Shadow’

Midshipman Balraj Dhanda of the Royal Navy, a volunteer who helped light the flames, described the spectacle as ‘really, really powerful’.

‘I think it creates the right atmosphere for people to have their own personal reflections and gives people time with their own thoughts,’ he added.

It took around 45 minutes to light the flames, which then burn for roughly four hours.

A Yeoman Warder, known as a Beefeater, stands amongst the first of thousands of lit flames which form part of an installation called Beyond the Deepening Shadow: The Tower Remembers, in the dry moat of the Tower of London, to mark the centenary of the end of First World War

Yeoman Warders lighting the first of thousands of flames in a lighting ceremony in the dry moat of the Tower of London as part of an installation called Beyond the Deepening Shadow: The Tower Remembers, to mark the centenary of the end of First World War

Yeoman Warders lighting the first of thousands of flames in a lighting ceremony in the dry moat of the Tower of London as part of an installation called Beyond the Deepening Shadow: The Tower Remembers, to mark the centenary of the end of First World War

Yeoman Warders lighting the first of thousands of flames in a lighting ceremony in the dry moat of the Tower of London as part of an installation called Beyond the Deepening Shadow: The Tower Remembers, to mark the centenary of the end of First World War

The ceremony was accompanied by a specially commissioned sound installation featuring choral music, as well as words from war poet Mary Borden’s Sonnets To A Soldier.

The ceremony was ‘amazing’, according to Dick Harrold, governor of the Tower of London.

He added: ‘What is so special about it is it means many different things.

‘The message with the sound is not focused so much on those that were lost, but those that were left behind, the bereaved and others who were affected by war.’

Spectators gathered on vantage points around the tower to witness the spectacle and a minute’s silence was also observed

A woman photographs lit torches that are part of the installation ‘Beyond the Deepening Shadow’ at the Tower of London, this evening

The success of the 2014 display of poppies at the tower meant Historic Royal Palaces, who maintain the landmark, were keen to mark the centenary of Armistice.

He added: ‘But, of course, we couldn’t do poppies again.’

Spectators gathered on vantage points around the tower to witness the spectacle and a minute’s silence was also observed.

The ceremony, named Beyond The Deepening Shadow, will be repeated each night until the final showing on Remembrance Sunday.

Members of the public can watch the spectacle for free.

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    WORLD WAR ONE’S BATTLE OF THE SOMME: ONE OF THE BLOODIEST FIGHTS IN HISTORY T

    The Battle of the Somme, also known as the Somme Offensive, was a battle of the First World War fought by the armies of the British and French empires against the German Empire

    Lasting 141 days, the Battle of the Somme was the bloodiest battle of the First World War. 

    Around 420,000 British soldiers, 200,000 Frenchmen and 500,000 Germans were killed in the battle.

    It is estimated 24,000 Canadian and 23,000 Australian servicemen also fell in the four-month fight.

    The British and French joined forces to fight the Germans on a 15-mile-long front, with more than a million-people killed or injured on both sides.

    The Battle started on the July 1, 1916, and lasted until November 19, 1916. The British managed to advance seven-miles but failed to break the German defence.

    On the first day alone, 19,240 British soldiers were killed after ‘going over the top’ and more than 38,000 were wounded.

    But on the last day of the battle, the 51st Highland Division took Beaumont Hamel and captured 7,000 German prisoners.

    The plan was for a ‘Big Push’ to relieve the French forces, who were besieged further south at Verdun, and break through German lines.

    Although it did take pressure off Verdun it failed to provide a breakthrough and the war dragged on for another two years. 

     

    Source: Read Full Article