Tory peer suggests the Queen should be DRIVEN to London

Calls for Queen to be brought to London by car or train so people can pay tribute to the cortege across England rather than adding to the huge queues for her lying in state in Westminster after she is flown from Scotland

  • Original plan called for Queen to be brought to London by Royal Train
  • But she will be taken from Edinburgh to London tomorrow night by air 
  • But it could mean thousands more people descend on London this week
  • Officials have already warned that queues to see her in could be five miles long
  • Full coverage: Click here to see all our coverage of the Queen’s passing

Officials have been urged to slow the Queen’s final journey from Scotland to London to allow more people to pay their last respects. 

The late monarch’s body is currently in Edinburgh and the original plan had been for her to be brought to London by the Royal Train, allowing people to line the track as it passed.

But instead she will be flown to London tomorrow ahead of a period of laying in state in Westminster Hall from Wednesday.

It is thought that security and safety concerns for trackside well-wishers are behind the decision to use an aircraft instead of the East Coast Mainline.

But it could mean thousands more people descend on London this week. Officials have already warned that queues to see her in Parliament could pass five miles in lengths with 30-hour waits to shuffle past.

Former minister Baroness Stowell said: ‘Hope a solution can involve the Queen’s coffin being driven down from Edinburgh through a range of cities, towns and villages so more people can feel involved and bid her farewell as she makes her final journey.’

The late monarch’s body is currently in Edinburgh and the original plan had been for her to be brought to London by the Royal Train, allowing people to line the track as it passed.

But instead she will be flown to London tomorrow ahead of a period of laying in state in Westminster Hall from Wednesday. Pictured is King Charles in the hall today.

Former minister Baroness Stowell said: ‘Hope a solution can involve the Queen’s coffin being driven down from Edinburgh through a range of cities, towns and villages so more people can feel involved and bid her farewell as she makes her final journey.’

Later, the Queen will be taken from the Palace of Holyroodhouse to nearby St Giles’ Cathedral where her family, and a congregation drawn from all areas of Scottish society, will attend a service of thanksgiving for her life.

Charles will lead some of the royals – expected to be the Duke of York, Earl of Wessex and the Princess Royal and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence – on foot, while the Queen Consort and other members of the monarchy follow in cars.

Later in the evening, the King and other members of his family, likely his siblings, will hold a vigil at the cathedral in honour of the Queen. 

The queen’s coffin will lie at the cathedral for 24 hours, giving members of the public a chance to file past and pay their respects.

On Tuesday, it will be flown to London where the coffin will lie in state at the Houses of Parliament Palace from Wednesday afternoon until the morning of the funeral on September 19. 

Crowd barriers and portable toilets have been set up in Westminster before ordinary Britons start queuing for up to 30 hours to see the Queen lying in state.

Her Majesty’s coffin is currently in the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh and is being taken later to the nearby St Giles’ Cathedral, where her family, and a congregation drawn from all areas of Scottish society, will attend a service of thanksgiving for her life.

The coffin is arriving in London tomorrow and will be taken to Westminster Hall, near the Houses of Parliament, on Wednesday. 

From 5pm, members of the public will be able to file in to pay their respects to the late monarch for four days, before Her Majesty’s state funeral in Westminster Abbey on Monday.

But the queuing is set to begin today, with security staff, stewards and police officers already stationed along the route. Westminster Hall will remain open for 24 hours a day to accommodate as many people as possible.

Whilst more than 300,000 people came to see King George VI lying in state in Westminster Hall in 1952 – and 200,000 saw the Queen Mother’s coffin in 2002 – Whitehall chiefs are reportedly expecting a figure closer to a million mourners this time around. 

The figure would rival the estimated one million mourners who flooded the capital for the funeral of Princess Diana in 1997. 

Portable toilets and crowd control infrastructure such as barriers and flooring have been now set up in Victoria Tower Gardens. Full details of the route will be published at 10pm on Tuesday.

However, the five-mile route is expected to begin at Southwark Park south of the Thames, with mourners following the line of the river down past Parliament to Lambeth Bridge, where they will cross back on themselves by walking back up to Westminster. 

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