Victorian church changes its name from St Michael's to 'St Mike's'

Victorian church changes its name from St Michael’s to ‘St Mike’s’ in an attempt to be more trendy and attract younger generations

  • The church, open since Victorian times, is trying to attract younger generations
  • Its name change to ‘St Mikes’ will formally go into effect from December
  • As part of renovations to the Church, it is also opening up a coffee bar 

A Victorian church called St Michael’s has changed its name to ‘St Mike’s’ in a bid to be more trendy and attract younger people.

Explaining the reasoning behind the re-brand, Reverend Sarah Yetman said that she wants the 148-year-old church to be ‘attractive and engaging for younger generations’.

She added: ‘We’re bringing new life into the old building and planting a new congregation into the church.

‘Our vision at St Mike’s is that the church can be a beacon of light and hope within the local community. We aim to reach more young people and that we can see them come to know Jesus in their own way.’  

A Victorian church called St Michael’s (pictured, file photo) has changed its name to ‘St Mike’s’ in a bid to be more trendy and attract younger people

But speaking to The Sun, one person questioned the decision. 

‘The idea that teenagers will be more interested in going to church if we rename it ‘St Mike’s’ is ridiculous,’ they said. ‘What’s next — St Dave’s? St Pete’s?’

The name change to St Mike’s, which is found in Bournemouth and used Church of England money in its renovation, will formally go into effect in December.

The church is also opening a coffee bar as part of its renovation, and hopes to offer a school drop off cafe several mornings a week, which will also offer visitors information about events in the local community and local services. 

Bishop of Southampton Reverend Debbie Sellin told the Bournemouth Echo: ‘It’s amazing what has been achieved at St Mike’s recently, so it was an honour to be able to join with the team here and celebrate the reopening of this wonderful church.

‘They have created a vibrant community hub where people can come to explore their faith and find a sense of belonging.

Explaining the reasoning behind the re-brand, Reverend Sarah Yetman (pictured) said that she wants 148-year-old church to be ‘attractive and engaging for younger generations’

‘There is so much going on for adults and kids alike, and I would urge everyone to come and take a look at what is on offer.’

The Church of England has previously come under fire for adding attractions into churches as part of its effort to entice Church-goers from younger generations.

Two years ago, it came under fire for installing a helter-skelter in Norwich Cathedral, and was criticised in 2019 for opening a nine-holy crazy golf course in Rochester Cathedral’s nave.

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