What did the Zodiac Killer's cipher say?

THE Zodiac Killer terrorized the San Francisco area in the 1960s and left many people wondering who they were. 

The killer was infamously known for using a special code to communicate with the police. 

What did the Zodiac Killer's cipher say?

In November 1969, the infamous Zodiac Killer, sent a 340 cipher to the San Francisco Chronicle while bragging that they had no fear of execution. 

The difficult code remained unsolved for decades, but it was finally cracked. 

The coded letter – full of jumbled letters, numbers and symbols – read: “I hope you are having lots of fun in trying to catch me.

“I am not afraid of the gas chamber because it will send me to paradise all the sooner because I now have enough slaves to work for me.”

The chilling message was cracked by citizen coding experts, according to an article in The Chronicle in December 2020. 

Coding expert David Oranchak said: “Last weekend, a team I’m on solved the 340 and submitted it to the FBI.

“They have confirmed the solution. No joke! This is the real deal.”

And today the FBI acknowledged the code-breakers achievements. 

The FBI statement said: "The FBI is aware that a cipher attributed to the Zodiac killer was recently solved by private citizens.

"The Zodiac Killer remains an ongoing investigation for the FBI San Francisco Division and our local law enforcement partners.

"The Zodiac killer terrorized multiple communities across Northern California and even though decades have gone by, we continue to seek justice for the victims of these brutal crimes.”

Who was the Zodiac Killer and what did he do? 

On October 6, 2021, a group of cold case investigators claimed they had finally cracked the Zodiac Killer's identity.

The man the Case Breakers, a team of specialists who have worked to solve some of America's most high-profile unsolved cases, say is responsible for the string of five murders in 1968 and 1969 is Gary Francis Poste.

They also claim to have linked Poste to a sixth killing hundreds of miles away that has never before been connected to the Zodiac.

According to Fox News, a team of more than "40 detectives, journalists, and military intelligence officers made up the so-called Case Breakers," who cracked the Zodiac Killer's identity.

However, Poste is believed to have died in 2018.

The team said they discovered Poste's identity after years of digging through new forensic evidence and at his darkroom.

One image uncovered from the darkroom purportedly featured scars on Poste's forehead which match a sketch of the Zodiac.

The team said the Zodiac's ciphers also point to Poste.

On one note, removing the letters of Poste's full name revealed an alternate message, according to former Army counterintelligence agent Jen Bucholtz.

"So you've got to know Gary's full name in order to decipher these anagrams," Bucholtz told Fox News.

"I just don't think there's any other way anybody would have figured it out."

The Zodiac Killer went on a killing spree across Northern California from the late 1960s to the early 1970s. 

The serial killer sent a series of taunting letters and cards to San Francisco newspapers and once claimed to have murdered 37 victims. 

The Zodiac murdered five known victims in Benicia, Vallejo, Napa County, and San Francisco, between December 1968 and October 1969.

In an October 13, 1969 description, police said the killer was a five-foot-eight man aged between 35 to 45, who had brown hair – with possibly a tint of red – and needed glasses.

The vicious killer targeted young couples, a male cab driver but their identity remains unknown. 

How long did the Zodiac Killer's code take to crack? 

The Zodiac Killer’s 340 ciphers took 51 years to crack after it was first published in 1969.

The code was cracked by David Oranchak, from America, Jarl Van Eyck from Belgium, and Dr Samuel Blake from Australia.

And Dr Blake has now revealed how he cracked the Zodiac Killer's coded message.

The message was one of several sent to newspapers during the killing spree.

Another one of the cypher puzzles solved in 1969 by a California school teacher and his wife read: "I like killing because it is so much fun.”

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