Will BBC chiefs get difficult over Stacey Dooley's Nice 'n' Easy cash?

Will BBC chiefs get nasty and difficult over Stacey Dooley’s Nice ‘n’ Easy cash? Strictly star faces showdown over Clairol advertising deal

  • BBC journalist Stacey Dooley signs lucrative deal to advertise haircare products
  • Dooley has been unveiled as ‘the face’ of Clairol’s Nice ‘n Easy hair colourings
  • She presents the BBC Three reality show Glow Up: Britain’s Next Make-Up Star 

She is one of the BBC’s most prized stars, fronting a string of documentaries on major social issues and winning Strictly Come Dancing.

But now Stacey Dooley faces a showdown with Corporation bosses after signing a lucrative deal to advertise haircare products that one inside called a ‘head-on conflict of interest’.

The 33-year-old journalist, who also presents BBC Three reality show Glow Up: Britain’s Next Make-Up Star, was last week unveiled as ‘the face’ of Clairol’s Nice ‘n Easy hair colourings.

Stacey Dooley faces a showdown with Corporation bosses after signing a lucrative deal to advertise haircare products that one inside called a ‘head-on conflict of interest

But her decision to sign a deal with the US giant has been criticised by BBC staff who claim it jeopardises Corporation independence.

Guidelines require all programme makers and presenters to declare ‘any personal interests which may affect their work with the BBC’. 

It was unclear last night whether Dooley – who won Strictly in 2018 and is now dating her professional dance partner Kevin Clifton – had told BBC management about her Clairol contract before it was announced by the company.

It was unclear last night whether Dooley – who won Strictly in 2018 and is now dating her professional dance partner Kevin Clifton – had told BBC management about her Clairol contract before it was announced by the company

One veteran programme-maker, said he would be surprised if broadcasting chiefs had approved Dooley’s deal, saying it could prove ‘difficult for the BBC’.

And a BBC journalist said: ‘It should be forbidden for anyone in news and current affairs to do commercial work like this. If someone asked me to advertise anything, it would be a ‘no’.

A Corporation spokesman declined to be drawn on whether Dooley had consulted managers about her plans, but said of the commercial tie-up: ‘We will be discussing any implications with her.’

Dooley has already made a 20-second commercial, which launched on TV and online last week. In a statement announcing her appointment as a brand ambassador, the star said Clairol ‘has championed women for decades’ by allowing them to ‘take control of their own colour and to be true to themselves’.

The BBC does not have a blanket ban on staff doing commercials and has looser restrictions on freelancers who only make occasional programmes for them.

But rules are tougher for staff in news and current affairs and contracted stars whose work is primarily with the BBC.

Dooley’s employment status is not known, but she has been awarded an MBE for presenting dozens of investigative BBC documentaries on subjects such as sex trafficking, domestic violence and suicide bombers.

Last year she presented an edition of Panorama about Islamic State brides and next month she is due to present another edition of the BBC1’s flagship current affairs programme about babies born in lockdown.

Her work on Glow Up, a contest for amateur make-up artists, might also prove problematic, as it covers an industry in which Clairol and its parent company Coty Inc are leading players. Representatives for Ms Dooley did not respond to requests for comment.

The BBC does not have a blanket ban on staff doing commercials and has looser restrictions on freelancers who only make occasional programmes for them. But rules are tougher for staff in news and current affairs and contracted stars whose work is primarily with the BBC

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